Sept. 28, 2009

Week 40 Issue 13


WINGFIELD'S LIFE REVISITED IN CARROLL-BAMFORD COLLABORATION 

BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

The members of the Bayfield Historical Society learned a bit about the story of Lieutenant David Wingfield, RN at their most recent meeting on Sept. 28.

Authors, Paul Carroll and Don Bamford are shown looking over their first collaborative effort, “Freshwater Heritage – a History of Sailing on the Great Lakes”. (Submitted photo)
Authors, Paul Carroll and Don Bamford are shown looking over their first collaborative effort, “Freshwater Heritage – a History of Sailing on the Great Lakes”. (Submitted photo)

His story is told in the latest work from collaborating authors, Paul Carroll and Don Bamford entitled, “Four Years on the Great Lakes, 1813-1816: The Journal of Lieutenant David Wingfield, Royal Navy.”

Carroll, of Goderich, was guest speaker at the BHS meeting held at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building.

The information for the book has been gleaned from Wingfield’s 68-page, handwritten journal, which is transcribed fully in the book. Wingfield wrote his memoirs of his time in the “Lake Service” while living in England as a half-pay, retired naval-officer. These memoirs were donated to the Public Archives Canada through the Canadian Trade Commissioner in Bristol in 1932 by his daughter, Christiana.

The authors first read the memoirs in 1972. They were of significant value in writing a predecessor-book in which the authors also collaborated, “Freshwater Heritage”.

Wingfield’s story begins with his birth in 1792, in Windsor, Berkshire. It then addresses his initial service from 1806 in the Royal Navy in the Great Belt of Denmark and elsewhere, follows through his Great Lakes adventures, his time as an American POW, his brief role as a lake surveyor, his retirement in Gloucestershire, his family life and the perils of his financial struggles. The book explores and speculates about a number of mysteries in his later life. The authors have traced his location and activity as much as has been possible, up to his death in 1864.

Carroll said, “As time rolls on, we lose so much of our marine history because it does not get written down... As they died off, so also did the history. I am trying to do my small part.”

When asked why local nautical history is his writing subject of choice, Carroll said, “As time rolls on, we lose so much of our marine history because it does not get written down. I have known many ‘old salts’ as I grew up on the waterfront in Goderich, I talked to them, heard the great tales, but did not take the time to explore the details further. As they died off, so also did the history. I am trying to do my small part.”

The book is now available from Natural Heritage Books, of the Dundurn Group, Toronto.

CARROLL TO SHARE STORY OF AN ELUSIVE SHIPWRECK WITH READERS IN SPRING 2010

Could it be that the souls on an old shipwreck have been calling out to author Paul Carroll to share their stories with the world since he was but a ten-year-old boy?

According to his biography, Carroll’s first part-time job was working on the fishing tug Larry John. His first contact with a shipwreck occurred while setting nets somewhere southwest of Goderich in the 1950s. The electro-mechanical depth sounder on the tug provided an almost perfect silhouette in the roll of graph paper streaming out of it.

“I still remember it clearly,” said Paul. “But, for commercial fishermen, these images were places to avoid – and what difference would it make then, to a ten-year-old.”

However, the image, albeit not the location, remained burned in his mind. Today he wonders if it is possible that that early passage over a shipwreck was his initial encounter with the Wexford.

Carroll describes the Steamer Wexford, as a charming ship with her flared bow, tall masts, centre pilot house and her open canvas-sided hurricane deck. Prior to her work carrying cargo across the Great Lakes she saw adventure and romance in the South American trade under both the British and the French.

“The Wexford: Elusive Shipwreck of the 1913 Great Storm” traces her history from her British origins in 1883, through to her transition to a Laker...

On the lakes, her crew was comprised of mostly boys from Collingwood and Goderich. Her final voyage, under the direction of 24 year-old Captain Bruce Cameron, happened as the Great Storm of 1913 raged across Lake Huron. With Orrin Gordon, 16, at the wheel, she fought for hours trying to make port at Goderich, but eventually succumbed to the storm.

In the 87 years that followed she was said to be found several times, always in a different location, but she was finally discovered by sailor Don Chalmers when he caught her image on a simple fish finder as the pros searched the bottom further northward.

Carroll’s book “The Wexford: Elusive Shipwreck of the 1913 Great Storm” traces her history from her British origins in 1883, through to her transition to a Laker. He looks at her crew, the storm, the search and her ultimate discovery in southern Lake Huron as well as the controversy over how she should be protected.

This new offering by Carroll is set to be released by Dundurn Group, Toronto in the spring of 2010.

This will be Carroll’s third book. He has acted as collaborator and co-author-editor with fellow sailor and marine historian, Don Bamford, for two marine books: “Freshwater Heritage – a History of Sailing on the Great Lakes” and “Four Years on the Great Lakes: The Journal of Lieutenant David Wingfield RN.”

Carroll is also a very talented watercolorist and his written words are sometimes enhanced by his art.

With regards to the creative process, Carroll said, “I enjoy all of it. The research chore is endless – there is always something more to find out, some additional mystery to unravel.

“The painting of marine subjects is great fun. It is often done from old BW photos. I can add the color that brings a scene to life. I also find that many people enjoy recounting their local history in a visual form. With a book, such as the one I am completing on the Wexford, I can sometimes incorporate some of my watercolor endeavors.”

Jacket design for "Four Years on the Great Lakes"
Jacket design for "Four Years on the Great Lakes"
Front cover of the Wexford– The Last Sighting – oil by Captain C. ‘Bud’ Robinson
Front cover of the Wexford– The Last Sighting – oil by Captain C. ‘Bud’ Robinson

 

RAFFLE TO RAISE FUNDS FOR BAYFIELD RIVER VALLEY TRAILS

A local art gallery and a renowned artist are offering their resources to support one of our areas greatest natural resources: the Bayfield River Valley Trail Systems.

During the month of October, “Wild by Nature” an exhibition by artist, Robert Bateman, will be held at the Marten Arts Gallery on Main Street in the village.

From Oct. 2 until Nov. 13, raffle tickets will be sold at Marten Arts, and other participating stores, giving people the opportunity to win a valuable, signed publisher's proof Bateman print entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.” There are only 20 of these prints in existence. The proceeds from the raffle will go to the Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) for trail development. Tickets are $10 each or three for $25.

One lucky individual will win this valuable print by Robert Bateman. It is a signed publisher's proof entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.”
One lucky individual will win this valuable print by Robert Bateman. It is a signed publisher's proof entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.”

The draw will be made at the "Lighting of the Lights" ceremony in Clan Gregor Square on the Friday night of the Christmas in Bayfield weekend.

Members of the BRVTA will automatically be entered in the draw if they renew their Trail Association Membership and fill out the required forms before Oct. 31.

Born in Toronto, Bateman has always been a keen artist and naturalist. In the early 1960s he began to develop the style that would make him one of the foremost artists depicting nature. Since that time he has become a spokesman for many environmental and preservation issues and has used his artwork and limited edition prints in fundraising efforts.

Bateman said in his biography, “I can’t conceive of anything being more varied and rich and handsome than the planet earth. And its crowning beauty is the natural world. I want to soak it up, to understand it as well as I can, and to absorb it. And I’d like to put it together and express it in my paintings. This is the way I want to dedicate my work.”

In conjunction with the Bateman show, Marten Arts will also feature the Heirloom Decoys of Robert Kelly.

“The support of local businesses like Marten Arts ensures that our local trail system will grow and make Bayfield a better place to live and visit now and in the future,” said Dave Gillians, of the BRVTA.

An opportunity to explore one of the trails created by the BRVTA will take place on Oct. 4 when a Fall Colours Hike will be held on the Woodland Trail.

Participants are asked to meet at Clan Gregor Square at 1:30 p.m. for the approximately two hour trek. Following the walk, a social time will be held at the Albion Hotel.

This will be the first hike of the season, others will be held on Sunday afternoons until April. 

GOLF TOURNAMENT HELPS  LIONS' REALIZE FINANCIAL COMMITTMENTS

The 23rd annual Albion Golf Tournament generated over $3,700 for the Bayfield Lions’ Club. The tournament was held at the Bluewater Golf Course on Sept. 11.

Kim Muszynski, owner of the Albion Hotel, presented Larry Simpson of the Bayfield Lions’ Club with a cheque for over $3,700 at the club’s recent monthly dinner meeting. The money was raised at the 23rd Albion Golf Tournament held at the Bluewater Golf Course on Sept. 11. (Submitted photo)
Kim Muszynski, owner of the Albion Hotel, presented Larry Simpson of the Bayfield Lions’ Club with a cheque for over $3,700 at the club’s recent monthly dinner meeting. The money was raised at the 23rd Albion Golf Tournament held at the Bluewater Golf Course on Sept. 11. (Submitted photo)

The tournament winners were Nora West and her son, Gray.

This is the second consecutive year that the owner of the Albion Hotel, Kim Muszynski has invited the Bayfield Lions’ Club to benefit from his charity driven golf tournament. The club is very grateful to have received nearly $14,000 from these two tournaments.

The club members would like to thank the numerous volunteers who helped make both events a success. 

The funds will be used for local community projects as well as to help the Bayfield Club realize their financial commitment to the new CT Scanner for Huron County.

Over the course of two decades, Muszynski’s Albion golf tournaments have raised over $100,000 for a variety of area organizations.

 

MEMBERS SHARE A LOVE OF WRITING

A love of writing is what the members of the village Writers’ Circle have in common. The group recently celebrated their first anniversary. 

“I really want to celebrate the people who have made this Writers’ Circle possible. The first year can often make or break groups like these and their dedication has really helped us to gel. Long may we continue,” said Judy Keightley. 

Keightley had started a Writers’ Circle when she resided in Petrolia and after moving to Bayfield two years ago; she decided that there was a need for one here. 

“All writers seek out other writers as we need that support network,” she said.

The group meets every other Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. in the Bayfield Archives Room. They do some creative writing exercises and anyone who would like some constructive criticism is welcome to share their writing with the group or send it home with another member for critiquing. 

“We are also writing a collective novel, we brainstorm and then one person works on a chapter; we are working on Chapter Six at the moment,” Keightley said. 

There are currently eight members in the circle who range in age from early 20s to late 60s. They pen both poetry and prose. Half of the group had never written anything when they started. 

“Two of these new kids on the writers’ block have now had pieces published,” she said. “I definitely see the potential for future famous authors in our little group.”  

Recently the group welcomed a guest speaker from Keightley’s former writing group in Petrolia. This guest has had some success in becoming published and she shared her knowledge on the marketing and publishing side of writing. 

There is no cost involved in joining the Writer’s Circle and new members are welcome. 

“This first year has been such a rewarding experience,” said Keightley. “I have watched those people new to the writing process blossom, what they are producing has simply bawled me over.”  

For more information on the Writers’ Circle please email Judy Keightley at judykeightley@hotmail.com


LIONS’ CLUB

The quest for the heaviest Rainbow Trout will once again take centre stage on the weekend of Oct. 16-18 as part of the Bayfield Lions’ Club’s 31st Annual Rainbow Trout Derby.

Fish may be caught from the Bayfield River only from 6 a.m. on Friday to noon on Sunday. The weigh station will be set up at Rainbow Valley Campground.
The top three prizes are: first, $800; second, $400 and third, $300. The Eric Earle Memorial will be awarded to a contestant age 15 years or under. It consists of a cash award of $100 and a plaque. The Bill Thorpe Memorial will go to a person aged from 16-18 years. It is also a $100 cash prize and a plaque.

All participants will have a chance to win a variety of other prizes graciously donated by local merchants.

Tickets for the derby are available now at the following Bayfield locations: Nip N’ Tuck, Brandon Hardware, Bayfield Convenience and Gary Brandon at Rainbow Valley Campground. They are also available at Goderich Bait and Tackle. Until Oct. 11 tickets may be purchased for $20, after that date they will cost $25.

For more information please call Lion Rusty Brandon at 519 233-3158.
 

MUNICIPALITY NEWS

The future uses of public buildings such as the Bayfield Arena, Stanley Complex and the Bayfield Archives Building and Library are outlined in the three-part Facilities Review Report now posted on the Municipality of Bluewater’s homepage.

In the introduction to Part Two it states the reason behind the report.

“Staff was charged with the responsibility of reviewing, in an objective manner, all facilities owned and operated by the Municipality in order to address such issues as code compliance, accessibility requirements, capital requirements and issues as they may relate to long term feasibility.

“The accompanying reports have been prepared to orientate and educate our elected officials on the facility stock and assets of the municipality. It is intended to present in one format the major considerations that should be weighed in order that Council may then be prepared and informed to look at considerations with respect to future operations.

“The intent is only to present the needs, options, and considerations and not to debate the merits of any particular plan or idea as they may relate to political atmospheres.”

Citizens of Bayfield and area may find the recommendations of interest. To read the report visit www.town.bluewater.on.ca


BANNOCKBURN FALL HIKE

Looking for some autumnal colors? Then you need travel no further than the Bannockburn Conservation Area.

For more than 35 years nature lovers have been attending the annual Bannockburn Fall Hike. This year the 36th annual hike is scheduled for Oct. 4 between 1-3 p.m.

The 36th Annual Bannockburn Fall Hike is scheduled for Oct. 4.
The 36th Annual Bannockburn Fall Hike is scheduled for Oct. 4.


The Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority (ABCA) invites people to visit the former Bannockburn Wildlife Area, which is located at 76249 Bannockburn Line, two KMs north of Huron County Road 3, between Varna and Brucefield.

ABCA staff will be on hand to answer any nature questions. A self-guided tour booklet is also available for those who like to explore on their own. In addition, a professionally-narrated audio file can be downloaded free-of-charge from the ABCA website at abca.on.ca. or free compact discs can be obtained.

Those who take part in the Bannockburn Fall Hike can help reduce waste by bringing their own mugs to enjoy a complimentary drink of hot or cold apple cider. Locally grown apples will also be provided.

Admission is free but donations are welcome to support conservation education efforts. For further details contact the ABCA at 519-235-2610 or 1-888-286-2610.


CELEBRATION OF FIRST NATIONS

Bayfield is one of the communities involved in Huron County’s second annual Celebration of First Nations to be held over the weekend of Oct. 3 and 4. Blyth and Goderich will also be hosting events.

Clan Gregor Square will be the place to see First Nation’s Traditional Nation Dancers, Drummers and a Storyteller. The celebration will be held from noon to 3 p.m. on Oct. 4. In case of rain this free event will move into the Bayfield Town Hall.


FILM SOCIETY

The Great Debaters is the second of four films brought to the village for the fall series by The Bayfield Film Society. It will be shown at the Bayfield Town Hall on Oct. 15 at 7 p.m.

The other theatrical offerings for the season are Paschendale, Nov. 12; and Stone of Destiny, Dec. 10.

Individual show tickets may be purchased at the door for $10 each.

For ticket inquiries please contact Lynne Gillians at 519 565-5884 or email lynnegillians@hotmail.com

Please note that the films on the schedule have been changed or dates adjusted from the original announcement.


HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

The Bayfield Horticultural Society will host their annual Fall Pot Luck on Oct. 19.

The event for society members and invited guests will be held at St. Andrew’s United Church starting at 6:30 p.m. Those who attend should bring a dish to share plus their own cutlery and plates.

Following the meal, Shannon Ryan from The Garden Gate Gifts and Florals of Grand Bend will by the guest speaker. Her topic will be Trends in Floral Design.


BAYFIELD GUIDING 

The Centenary Celebration Calendar 1910-2010, created by members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding, is a hot ticket item.

Requests, for the calendar featuring local girls and Guiders in historic uniforms worn over the century, are coming in from as far away as Florida.

The calendars are selling for $10 each. The membership of Clinton and Bayfield units are not the only girls selling the calendar but they will receive a portion of the funds from every calendar sold, in recognition of their efforts behind this project. Calendars will be sold by units across Mid-western Ontario.

The photos for the calendar were shot on location at historical and heritage sites in both Clinton and Bayfield including: Mara St. Walkway, Pioneer Park and Beach, Bayfield Town Hall, Clan Gregor Square, Kildonan House Bed and Breakfast, Clinton Town Hall and the School Car on Wheels. Historical facts about Guiding’s 100 years are placed amongst the images.

Calendars are now available for sale from members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding as well as the Bayfield Village Inn, Interior Trends and Drs. Haney and Van Maanen’s Dental Office in Clinton.

The sale of this calendar is just one of the many exciting events planned in honor of the 100th anniversary of Girl Guides of Canada.


Members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding are selling copies of this calendar that they created to celebrate Girl Guides of Canada’s 100th anniversary. (click mage to view larger version)


ANGLICAN CHURCH

The Wardens of Trinity Anglican Church will be hosting a Social on Oct. 4 at 6 p.m. in the parish hall. This gathering is open to all church members, family and friends. Pulled Pork on a Bun will be on the menu.

The men in the congregation will enjoy their first Men’s Breakfast following a summer hiatus on Oct. 3 at 8:30 a.m. in the parish hall.

The first Sundays at Eleven Program for the fall season is scheduled for Oct. 18. The guest speaker will be Janet Snider. Her topic will be Enlivening Canadian History.


PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Knox Presbyterian Church is launching their Fall Bible Study on Oct. 1. The study is entitled, Exodus: Gateway to the Bible. Participants will take a journey from Egypt into the wilderness with Moses while reflecting on their own personal faith journey and the wilderness times of the Church. The series will run on Thursdays for five weeks and will be held from 9:30-11:30 a.m. All are welcome to attend.

Forty-eight pairs of eye glasses were recently delivered to Raylon Share Care Inc. due to the collection efforts made at Knox, Bayfield through their Eye Glass Program. These glasses will be distributed throughout the countries of Haiti, Honduras and Guatemala.

Another collection has already begun. Old eye glasses can be dropped off at Knox on Thursday mornings during October. These donations will make a tremendous difference in the quality of life for people in need.


FITNESS AND FUN

Fitness and Fun for both the mind and body is the focus of activities being offered in the village for the more mature among us.

Several of these programs are made possible by Town and Country Support Services (TCSS), while others are simply organized by community minded individuals and groups.

The TCSS are encouraging many avenues of fitness for people to explore this fall including: Dance Fit and Toning; Sit and Get Fit – Gentle Seated Exercises; Indoor Walking; Badminton.

Women’s Dance Fit and Toning is now back at the Bayfield Community Centre and is held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9-10 a.m. There is a pay as you go option - $3 per visit.

Sit and Get Fit – Gentle Seated Exercises will begin on Oct. 14. The classes will be held on Mondays and Wednesdays starting at 10 a.m. It is a gentle, mostly seated half hour class. The cost is $1 per class.

Indoor Walking will also begin on Oct. 14 and will take place on Mondays and Wednesdays. There is no charge to participate in this exercise which will be held from 10:15 a.m. to noon.

The above classes will be held in the Bayfield Community Centre.

Huron Centennial School in Brucefield will be the location for Badminton. There will be no charge to participate in this sport offered on Tuesdays from 7-9 p.m. starting on Oct. 13. Please call 519 565-2202 for more information.

Advanced Nordic Pole Walkers will meet for a brisk hour walk on Tuesdays at 8 a.m. and Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Participants are asked to meet at 6 Main Street.


BRIDGE CLUB

Looking for a social night of cards?

Then look no further than the Wednesday Evening Bridge Club. New members are always welcome to join. The club will meet on Sept. 30. The cards will be dealt at 7 p.m.


EUCHRE CLUB

As the leaves turn color, thoughts return to winter pastimes. With this in mind, the Bayfield Euchre Club has now begun their fall sessions.

The club meets on alternate Wednesdays at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building at 7:30 p.m. They will meet next on Oct. 7.

New players are invited to come and join returning regulars. The cost is only $1.50 per person. For more information contact Lee at 519 565-2765 in the evenings. 

 

BAYFIELD'S ARCHIVES ROOM IS A HAPPENING PLACE

 

Earlier this year, Ralph Laviolette became the fourth volunteer archivist for the Bayfield Archives Room since the position was created in 1977.  Since accepting the position, he has set up a volunteer effort to scan photos in the collection and now has about 400 images that can be seen in a slide show.
Earlier this year, Ralph Laviolette became the fourth volunteer archivist for the Bayfield Archives Room since the position was created in 1977. Since accepting the position, he has set up a volunteer effort to scan photos in the collection and now has about 400 images that can be seen in a slide show.

The Bayfield Archives is under the administration of the Bayfield Historical Society. Another ongoing project for the society is the restoration of the Helen McLeod II, a model of which is on display in the Archives Room.
The Bayfield Archives is under the administration of the Bayfield Historical Society. Another ongoing project for the society is the restoration of the Helen McLeod II, a model of which is on display in the Archives Room.


Ralph Laviolette shows just some of the 2,000 photographs in the archives’ inventory that will eventually be scanned to make information retrieval easier.

Images such as this one of James Archibald Gardiner (1819-1899) are a precious part of the collection.
Images such as this one of James Archibald Gardiner (1819-1899) are a precious part of the collection.
 

It is hoped that the archives collection of artifacts will eventually be expanded. Currently on display are such items as the original mail boxes from the Bayfield Post Office when it was housed in the building now known as the Turner Gallery
It is hoped that the archives collection of artifacts will eventually be expanded. Currently on display are such items as the original mail boxes from the Bayfield Post Office when it was housed in the building now known as the Turner Gallery

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

Nestled in the heart of Main Street, Bayfield is a little wooden structure boasting a rare Georgian store front. For over three decades it has been home to the Bayfield Historical Society’s Archives Room. 

A familiar sign beckons to all who wish to learn more about their family roots or the Village of Bayfield.
A familiar sign beckons to all who wish to learn more about their family roots or the Village of Bayfield.

And it continues to be a very happening place.

Ralph Laviolette became the latest in a line of distinguished volunteer village archivists earlier in 2009, after Elaine Sturgeon stepped down from the role she held for seven years. 

“Most of my efforts to date have focused on what the holdings are and how to help villagers and visitors from far and wide research their memories for Bayfield people and places,” said Laviolette.

In an effort to make information retrieval easier, he has organized a volunteer effort to scan photos. He estimates that there are over 2,000 in the collection.

“We have been scanning photographs like mad,” said Laviolette. “And we now have 400 photos that can be displayed through a slide show.”

Volunteers are also working to catalogue the large book collection which may soon surpass 400 titles and to scan much of what written material is scan-able.

Since the late 1950s volunteers have been compiling scrapbooks in the fashion of a “clipping service”. These scrapbooks feature clippings of ads and news articles of Bayfield and area. Laviolette is now working on indexing these scrapbooks.

“In the last few months I have been learning an awful lot about just what is kept here. We are working on creating spreadsheets, or finding aids, to help people trace their roots easier when they come in,” he said.

He went on to say that he has been surprised to discover just how many people come in looking for family. He has noted that they hail from all over North America as well as Europe, especially Swiss and Germans who have traced their ancestors to the Zurich and Hensall areas.

The archivist has also kept busy as the editor of the 2009 Huron Historical Notes featuring the village. It is a 56-page booklet about Bayfield history and should be available for sale at the Archives Room by the end of this week. It will sell for $8. This is just one in a series of titles created by Dianne Smith a professional researcher. Others booklets in the series include: “The Repository of Blyth History”, “Early Industries Part I” and “People and Places in Eastern Huron”.

Laviolette feels that the new Bayfield history will be an appropriate update to the last history book written in 1981 (gray cover). 

To continue all his efforts within the building’s walls more volunteers are needed. In addition, anyone with an interest in researching and preparing a walking tour of the Bayfield cottage and harbor area would be most welcome. Laviolette hopes this tour could be created as an accompaniment to the already existing tour of historic Main Street.

Anyone wishing to visit the Archives Room to trace a family history or learn more about the village is welcome to drop in on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 1-5 p.m. Private appointments may also be arranged. 

It is Laviolette’s hope that some of the items can eventually be stored away and a more welcoming environment for tourists and visitors be created. His thoughts echo those of the Bayfield Historical Society membership who would like to see a new building constructed for the library, post office boxes and public washrooms, leaving the current building envelope for a historical archives, storage for municipally significant heritage documents and a visitors' welcome centre. 
 
“We have a few village artifacts here but it would be great to have more on display. We have people living in this community who are third or fourth generation and anyone who finds items of interest is welcome to donate them so that they can be available for everyone to enjoy,” said Laviolette. 

 

SUBMISSIONS

Features such as the one on author Paul Carroll’s efforts to preserve our precious nautical history and the ongoing work by such people as Volunteer Archivist Ralph Laviolette, demonstrate how deeply Bayfield and area residents feel about protecting their heritage. And you don’t have to be a fourth generation villager to feel that way.

It is marvelous how many new subscribers to the Bayfield Breeze have commented on how much they enjoy our village and reading regularly about the happenings here. Whether theirs was a chance visit or a recurring tryst they have all fallen in love.

Some 20 years ago, I too “discovered” this village. But really you don’t find Bayfield, it finds you. We are a village that embraces newcomers, offers up our history and invites everyone to make it their own – it’s just a natural part of our charm. 

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome. Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m. Please email me at
bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443. Hope to see you online soon at www.villageofbayfield.com - Melody

 

 

 

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Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder