Oct. 21, 2009

Week 43 Issue 16


TRINITY TO RING THE BELL FOR CLIMATE CHANGE DAY OF ACTION

BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

GoTo 350.org

Trinity Anglican Church’s bell will ring out once per minute for 350 minutes on Oct. 24.  Why? It is part of a global effort to raise awareness of growing global carbon dioxide levels and the resulting increase in global temperature.

The website 350.org is calling on people around the world to organize an action this Saturday incorporating the number 350 at an iconic place in their community, and then upload a photo of their event to the 350.org website.

The idea behind 350.org is an international campaign dedicated to building a movement to unite the world around solutions to the climate crisis.

350.org was founded by American author Bill McKibben and a team of university friends. McKibben wrote one of the first books on global warming for the general public.


According to the website, the 350.org mission is “to inspire the world to rise to the challenge of the climate crisis - to create a new sense of urgency and of possibility for our planet.”

Their focus is on the number 350, as in parts per million, the level scientists have identified as the safe upper limit for CO2 in the atmosphere.

To tackle climate change global citizens need to move quickly and act in unison. This December, world leaders will meet in Copenhagen, Denmark to create a new global treaty on cutting emissions.

The problem according to the website is, “The treaty currently on the table doesn't meet the severity of the climate crisis. It doesn't pass the 350 test.”

Accelerating arctic warming and other early climate impacts have led scientists to conclude that we are already above the safe zone at our current 390 ppm, and that unless we are able to rapidly return to 350 ppm this century, we risk reaching tipping points and irreversible impacts such as the melting of the Greenland ice sheet and major methane releases from increased permafrost melt.

For all of human history until about 200 years ago, our atmosphere contained 275 parts per million of carbon dioxide. This is a useful amount. Without some CO2 and other greenhouse gases that trap heat in our atmosphere, the planet would be too cold for humans to inhabit.

Beginning in the 18th century, humans began to burn coal, gas and oil to produce energy and goods. The amount of carbon in the atmosphere began to rise. Many of the activities we do every day like turning the lights on, cooking food, or heating or cooling our homes rely on these energy sources that emit carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The result being that are planet is currently registering 390 parts per million CO2. This number is rising by about two parts per million every year.

Go To 350.orgSo on Saturday, 350.org hopes to have actions at hundreds of iconic places around the world - from the Taj Mahal to the Great Barrier Reef in an effort to send a clear message to world leaders.

This message being, “the solutions to climate change must be equitable, they must be grounded in science, and they must meet the scale of the crisis.

“If an international grassroots movement holds our leaders accountable to the latest climate science, we can start the global transformation we so desperately need.”

In Bayfield, the Trinity Anglican Church building with over 150 years of history can be considered iconic and the perfect place for a day of action. The bell ringing initiative shall begin at 10 a.m. and run through the day until 3:49 p.m. All in the community are invited to drop by and offer their support of the project and maybe even ring the bell for climate change.


OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD TRADITION FOR CONGREGATION

Trinity Anglican Church has some big shoes to fill – well, shoe boxes that is. The congregation has 100 shoe boxes to fill as part of their annual Operation Christmas Child project for Samaritan’s Purse.

Operation Christmas Child has become a tradition at Trinity since it was started about five years ago under the direction of Marla Dykstra and the Outreach Committee.

The campaign will be kicked off at Trinity on Oct. 25. Participants are asked to take a box and fill it with gifts and necessities for either a boy or girl in one of three age categories: 2-4, 5-9 or 10-14. Instructions are provided as to what will and won’t be accepted in the box; a well-balanced selection of such items as, school supplies, hygiene items, small gifts and toys are acceptable. A donation of $7 per box is also appreciated as this helps with shipping costs.

This year boxes from Trinity and churches throughout Southwestern Ontario will go to Argentina, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissua, Haiti, Cote d’Ivoire, Nicaragua, Senegal, Sierre Leone and Uruguay.

Filled boxes should be returned to Trinity on or before Nov. 15 as they will be blessed at the church service that morning.

EXTENDED FALL TURKEY HUNT CLOSES WOODLAND TRAIL UNTIL OCT. 25

The Woodland Trail is currently closed due to the new extended fall turkey hunt.

The Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) has closed the trail from now until October 25th. By agreement with the Woodland Trail's landowner partners, this trail is closed during deer and turkey hunting seasons because of the danger to hikers.
 
No hunting is permitted on the Sawmill and Heritage Trails and they will remain open all year.
 
A local art gallery and a renowned artist are offering their resources to support one of our areas greatest natural resources: the Bayfield River Valley Trail Systems.

Throughout October, “Wild by Nature” an exhibition by artist, Robert Bateman, will be held at the Marten Arts Gallery on Main Street in the village.

From now until Nov. 13, raffle tickets will be sold giving people the opportunity to win a valuable, signed publisher's proof Bateman print entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.” There are only 20 of these prints in existence. The proceeds from the raffle will go to the Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) for trail development. Tickets are $10 each or three for $25. 

Tickets are available at Marten Arts, Plover's, Outside Projects, Sugar, Pharmasave Michael’s Pharmacy and Brandon Hardware.

The draw will be made at the "Lighting of the Lights" ceremony in Clan Gregor Square on the Friday night of the Christmas in Bayfield weekend.

Members of the BRVTA will automatically be entered in the draw if they renew their Trail Association Membership and fill out the required forms before Oct. 31.

For more information on the raffle and to help sell tickets please email Helen Varekamp, trail association fundraising and membership chair at hvarekamp@tcc.on.ca.


AREA GIRL GUIDES TO CONVERGE ON TOWN HALL AND UNITE IN SONG

A chorus of voices will be heard emanating from the Bayfield Town Hall on the evening of Oct. 21 as area girls and Guiders unite their voices in song in celebration of their 100th anniversary.

That same evening, all across the province, celebration campfires will be held both indoors and out marking an early start to the 2010 festivities.

Girls and Guiders from such communities as Goderich, Clinton, Exeter and Bayfield will join together at the hall to share in the singing of some old campfire classics such as “Tall Trees” and “Barges.” The event has been organized so that the membership across the province will be singing the same songs at the same time.

This event is open to the public and both past and future members of Guiding are most welcome. The doors to the town hall will open at 6:15 p.m. Please note that seating will be limited. Song books will be provided so that all in attendance can join in the singing.


Chocolatey Mint Girl Guide Cookies have arrived in Bayfield. These cookies are now available for $4 a box from members of Bayfield Guiding or the Bayfield Village Inn.

The Centenary Celebration Calendar 1910-2010, created by members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding, and for sale in Mid-western Ontario, is also available.  The calendars are selling for $10 each.

Locally, calendars are available for sale from members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding as well as The Village Book Shop, Bayfield Village Inn, Interior Trends and Drs. Haney and Van Maanen’s Dental Office in Clinton.

REMEMBER ME?

There are countless photographs of people in the Bayfield Historical Society’s Archives collection, but sadly their names were never recorded. In this section we will showcase an image with the hopes that one of our subscribers might be able to identify the individual(s) in the photo. Please email your information to the Editor’s attention at the address listed near the bottom of the page in “Submissions”.

In this week’s “REMEMBER ME?” we have a photo taken in front of The Hut, the oldest building in the village still standing. It was built in 1836 of cedar logs. It served as the first school in all of Stanley Twp. However, the history of the building, as interesting and lengthy as it is, is not what we seek in this feature. We would like to know who any or all of the six individuals are in the photograph. Bayfield’s Volunteer Archivist, Ralph Laviolette, believes the image was taken in the early 1900s. Anyone remember them?

If you recognize any of these people, please share your knowledge by emailing The  Bayfield Breeze!

If you recognize any of these people, please share your knowledge by emailing The Bayfield Breeze! Click image for larger version.

 

Charles Spencer, of Bayfield, a veteran of the fishing derby, tried various vantage points fishing on Saturday. Here, he sits just west of the bridge by the Carson-Elliott Marina.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!
Charles Spencer, of Bayfield, a veteran of the fishing derby, tried various vantage points fishing on Saturday. Here, he sits just west of the bridge by the Carson-Elliott Marina.

 

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

“Escape from War: The Vietnam War…One Family’s Story and the War’s Impact on Canada Today” is the title
of the presentation to be made at the next Bayfield Historical Society meeting, Oct. 26.

Jerry Selk will be the guest speaker at the meeting to be held at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building starting at 7:30 p.m.


CHAMBER NEWS

Oct. 22 is the date set for the Annual General Meeting of the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce (BACC).

Items on the agenda will include the chamber’s year in review, the treasurer’s report and member recognition.

A highlight of the evening will be a video presentation regarding Celebrate the Lake, organized by Geoff Fry.

The election of the chamber executive for 2009-10 will also take place.

All BACC members are encouraged to attend the meeting which will begin at 7 p.m. at the Bayfield Town Hall.


UNITED CHURCH

It’s the time of year when local choirs dust off their Christmas carol books to prepare for the festive season.

St. Andrew’s United Church will hold their first choir practice on Oct. 22 at 8 p.m. Following this initial meeting, practices will be held every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

Paul Howe will be conducting the annual Christmas Carol Service this year and all in the community are invited to join the choir, no matter their denomination.

The membership of St. Andrew’s invites all in the community to celebrate the bounty of the season with them on Nov. 7.

St. Andrew’s will be holding their annual Harvest Dinner at the Bayfield Community Centre starting at 4:30 p.m.

Tickets are available now for $13, adults; and $6 for children, aged six to 10 years. Please phone 519 565-2479 for tickets.

Looking ahead, the St. Andrew’s United Church Women will hold their annual Christmas Holly Bazaar on the Christmas in Bayfield Weekend.

The event will be held at St. Andrew’s on Nov. 13 from 2-8 p.m. and Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
 

LAKE HURON LEARNING

Local individuals are enhancing the knowledge of seniors in the community by leading sessions in the Enhanced Aging Series organized by Lake Huron Learning.

On Nov. 4, Bayfield’s volunteer Archivist, Ralph Laviolette, will share his knowledge of the early days of Huron County and also how to begin a family search. This informative afternoon will be held from 1-3 p.m. at Goderich Place.

The session can be attended for $15 a person. For more information please call 519 524-4154 or email info@lakehuronlearning.ca


TOWN HALL

All are invited to come out to the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 7, to jump and jive, swing and sway and cut a rug as The Festival City Big Band makes their annual appearance.

This 17-piece band will provide dancing from 9 p.m. to midnight on Nov. 7. A light lunch will be served at this licensed event.

Tickets are available now by calling Charles Kalbfleisch at 519 565-2244 or Pat Langley at 519 565-2894. Tickets are also available at Ernie King Music and The Casablanca Ballroom and Dance Studio, both in Goderich.

The Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society appreciates the generous sponsorship of this event by OLG.

FILM SOCIETY

Paschendale is the third of four films brought to the village for the fall series by The Bayfield Film Society. It will be shown at the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m.

The final theatrical offering for the season will be Stone of Destiny on Dec. 10.

Individual show tickets may be purchased at the door for $10 each.

For ticket inquiries please contact Lynne Gillians at 519 565-5884 or email lynnegillians@hotmail.com


HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

The Bayfield and Area Horticultural Society (BAHS) will old their Annual General Meeting on Nov. 16.

It will be held at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building starting at 7:30 p.m. The guest speakers will be Leigh and Jerry Selk who will share their knowledge of Viticulture.


BRIDGE CLUB
 


Helen Carson and Gordon Kurtz were the high scorers when the Wednesday Evening Bridge Club gathered for a friendly round of cards on Oct. 14.

The club will meet next on Oct. 28 at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building.

The cards will be dealt at 7 p.m. and new members are always welcome to join.


EUCHRE CLUB

The Bayfield Euchre Club has now begun their fall sessions.

The club meets on alternate Wednesdays at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building at 7:30 p.m. They will meet next on Oct. 21.

New players are invited to come and join returning regulars. The cost is only $1.50 per person. For more information contact Lee at 519 565-2765 in the evenings.


LAST WEEK'S PHOTO?

Bayfield Breeze subscriber John Rouse emailed to say that he believes the young lady in the rowboat pictured in Week 41 Issue 14 to be Lucy Woods.

We’re still wondering who the young man is in the photo which appeared in Week 42 Issue 15. If someone recognizes him this week, please email the editor.

FISHING ONLY HALF THE FUN OF ANNUAL TROUT DERBY

 

Participating in the derby which runs from 6 a.m. on Friday to noon on Sunday requires lots of patience and a comfy seat.
Participating in the derby which runs from 6 a.m. on Friday to noon on Sunday requires lots of patience and a comfy seat. 

Carolyn Spencer, of Ajax, and her father-in-law Charles Spencer, of Bayfield, tried their luck further up the pier. The derby has been a Spencer family tradition since 1990, with Charles competing each year and Carolyn participating as often as possible.
Carolyn Spencer, of Ajax, and her father-in-law Charles Spencer, of Bayfield, tried their luck further up the pier. The derby has been a Spencer family tradition since 1990, with Charles competing each year and Carolyn participating as often as possible.

 Some people bring all the comforts of home with them when taking part in the Bayfield Lions’ Club’s annual Rainbow Trout Derby. Yes, that is a couple of couches sitting by the river’s edge.
Some people bring all the comforts of home with them when taking part in the Bayfield Lions’ Club’s annual Rainbow Trout Derby. Yes, that is a couple of couches (far left) sitting by the river’s edge.

The flats east of the Bayfield Bridge were a favorite location for participants in the derby. Still other participants took to the water to try their luck.
The flats east of the Bayfield Bridge were a favorite location for participants in the derby. Still other participants took to the water to try their luck.

Asha Lockhart, 8, of Exeter, took part in the derby with her grandfather. Her strategy was to let her pole rest on the pier and then to go hunting for shells. She proudly displayed her shell collection on Saturday afternoon. Come Sunday morning her patience paid off as she ended up being the only person to catch a trout off the south pier that day. Using her six foot pole she reeled in a 1.82 lb rainbow trout and earned the Eric Earle Memorial prize as a result.
Asha Lockhart, 8, of Exeter, took part in the derby with her grandfather. Her strategy was to let her pole rest on the pier and then to go hunting for shells. She proudly displayed her shell collection on Saturday afternoon. Come Sunday morning her patience paid off as she ended up being the only person to catch a trout off the south pier that day. Using her six foot pole she reeled in a 1.82 lb rainbow trout and earned the Eric Earle Memorial prize as a result.

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

Two hundred and forty-eight people took part in the always popular Bayfield Lions’ Club’s 31st Annual Rainbow Trout Derby on Oct. 16-18.

The winners of the heaviest rainbow trouts were: first prize of $800, Terry Bolger, of Ariss, 9.20 lb.; second prize of $400, Scott Graves, 8.53 lb.; and third prize of $300, John Pigg, of Cambridge, 8.09 lb.

The Eric Earle Memorial was awarded to Asha Lockhart, 8, of Exeter, with a trout weighing 1.82 lb. She was followed closely by Veronica Marchuk, 9, and Edward Webb, 13.

The Bill Thorpe Memorial went to Taylor Mitchell, with a trout weighing 6.29 lb. 

There were 46 rainbows and 16 salmon entered into the competition.

“The fishing was fairly weak this year; the majority consensus was the water was too clear and too low. We needed a rain earlier in the week to get the fish up,” said Lion Rusty Brandon, event organizer.

The Lions’ Club would like to thank all of the participants as well as the individuals and businesses that donated prizes for the derby.  

Participants in the Bayfield Lions’ Club’s 31st Annual Rainbow Trout Derby stood bundled against the cold on the North Pier at the mouth of the Bayfield River waiting for the fish to bite. They probably are as cold as they look as Saturday’s high temperatures only reached 8.7C
Participants in the Bayfield Lions’ Club’s 31st Annual Rainbow Trout Derby stood bundled against the cold on the North Pier at the mouth of the Bayfield River waiting for the fish to bite. They probably are as cold as they look as Saturday’s high temperatures only reached 8.7C.

 

“The fishing was fairly weak this year; the majority consensus was the water was too clear and too low."

 

Bayfield resident, Walter Turner, heads home after a day of competing in the annual trout derby. His attempts to catch “a big one” on Saturday proved futile.
Bayfield resident, Walter Turner, heads home after a day of competing in the annual trout derby. His attempts to catch “a big one” on Saturday proved futile.

 

SUBMISSIONS

Last week I had the good fortune to go on a driving tour of Northern Ontario and Gatineau, Quebec. It was territory I had never explored before and it was an enriching experience. Small towns with gorgeous country churches and rolling pastures filled with grazing animals dotted the landscape.

As we drove closer to home the farmers were active on the land taking in the last of the harvest before the cold and the damp could claim it.

These images juxtaposed against the thought of global warming are what I am left with as I put to bed this issue of the Bayfield Breeze.

It compels me to join those who gather at Trinity Anglican Church on Saturday to ring the bell for climate change. For it may only be a symbolic gesture but if we as individuals around the world sound the alarm bells loud enough those who need to shall begin to listen.

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome. Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m. Please email me at bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443. Hope to see you online soon at www.villageofbayfield.com - Melody

 

 

Click to sign up for weekly email notices.

 
Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder