Oct. 28, 2009



Week 44 Issue 17

HARRY'S BAR RESTAURANT,  A MAIN STREET ICON, WILL BE MISSED

Sherrie described the sale as “bittersweet”.

BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER 

“Harry MacDonald and Hugh Garton were two individuals that a lot of people won’t forget too quickly.”

Harry’s Bar Restaurant on Main Street will close its doors on Oct. 31. The owners, Sherrie Garton (middle) and her son R.J. (right) described the recent sale of the property as “bittersweet”. Joining them behind the bar for a photograph is bar manager, Marria Frayne.
Harry’s Bar Restaurant on Main Street will close its doors on Oct. 31. The owners, Sherrie Garton (middle) and her son R.J. (right) described the recent sale of the property as “bittersweet”. Joining them behind the bar for a photograph is bar manager, Marria Frayne.

According to Hugh’s wife Sherrie Garton, many people often commented on their similarities; how they were a lot a like in their attitudes and how they could never stand still. The two also shared a love of ownership for Harry’s Bar  Restaurant. For over 30 years the establishment has been a mainstay for both locals and visitors alike. This village icon will be closing its doors, forever, on Oct. 31.

Following Harry’s passing, the Gartons, along with son, R.J., became the owners of the business in May of 2006. Hugh’s death in the spring of this year has prompted the sale of the business.

The new owners will take possession of the property in mid to late December. It is Sherrie’s understanding that they will be adapting the space for retail. Six of the seven existing retail shops at the back of the building are leased for the spring and the new owners will be assuming those leases.

Sherrie commented that many people have come in and said how much they are going to miss the patio and she admits she will as well.

“Hugh and I always loved to sit on the patio, talking with the tourists who came in and with our friends. It was a real social patio,” she said.  

She described the sale as “bittersweet”.

“We had four summers here and it was a huge learning curve for us – it was a lot different behind the bar than in front. It really gave us a different perspective,” she said.

She also noted that despite how taxing the industry can be they did have a lot of fun.

“I have never been in business in any other community but I feel that if you’re going to be in business, Bayfield is the place to be, everyone is very supportive,” she said.

She went on to comment on how wonderful their staff has been over the past four summers.

“R.J. had his first job in Bayfield working for Harry and a lot of other kids have come through here either working for Harry or for us,” she said.

R.J. plans to return to Victoria, B.C. in the New Year.

“He has lived out there in the past and really loves it; it will be good for him,” she said.

As for Sherrie she is not certain what her future holds but she plans to remain in Bayfield.

“I just need some time to think and process. I’ve been so busy these past few months. I’m sure I’ll drive my friends and family crazy in the meantime,” she laughed.

“It will be an end of an era party and we hope to have a lot of locals come out and celebrate.”

But first there will be a time to celebrate and music will be a big part of the festivities.

“The musicians who we had come through here were amazing. I was constantly blown away by the local talent.  And they enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere that Harry’s offered for performing,” she said.

In keeping with tradition, some fine local talent will take to the stage at Harry’s on their final weekend.

On Friday night, Oct. 30, Lake Effect, the band in which Sherrie was lead vocalist, will reunite for one final gig at Harry’s. They plan to start the show at 9 p.m.

“We welcome any musicians who would like to come and join us for an open mic forum,” she added.

Then on Oct. 31 from 4-8 p.m. the band Cheap Shirts will perform.

“It will be an end of an era party and we hope to have a lot of locals come out and celebrate,” she said. “We want it to be the Harry’s of old, full to the rafters, with everyone having a great time, we want to party the doors off – it will be a great way to go out.”

Harry and Hugh would know doubt agree.


TRINITY CHURCH RINGS BELL FOR 350.ORG AND PLANET EARTH

Trinity Anglican Church’s bell rang out once per minute for 350 minutes on Oct. 24 as part of a global effort to raise awareness of growing global carbon dioxide levels and the resulting increase in global temperature.

The website 350.org called on people around the world to organize an action this past Saturday incorporating the number 350 at an iconic place in their community and Trinity answered that call.

“I would think about 40 to 45 people came in - from those who volunteered, to those who simply dropped by. Most were local folks, although, one family came in from Seaforth,” explained Bill Higgs, who organized the event at Trinity.

“Historically churches have rung their bells at times of threat and crisis; on such occasions as, 9/11, VE Day, VJ Day, the Lockerbie tragedy and the Fenian raids,” he said.

 

The idea behind 350.org is an international campaign dedicated to building a movement to unite the world around solutions to the climate crisis.

According to the 350.org website, on Oct. 24, people in 181 countries came together for the most widespread day of environmental action in the planet's history. At over 5,200 events around the world, people gathered to call for strong action and bold leadership on the climate crisis.

The focus is on the number 350, as in parts per million, the level scientists have identified as the safe upper limit for CO2 in the atmosphere.

Accelerating arctic warming and other early climate impacts have led scientists to conclude that we are already above the safe zone at our current 390 ppm, and that unless we are able to rapidly return to 350 ppm this century, we risk reaching tipping points and irreversible impacts such as the melting of the Greenland ice sheet and major methane releases from increased permafrost melt.


TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS IS THEME OF DECORATING CONTEST 

With just over three weeks remaining before the Christmas season begins in Bayfield – businesses and restaurants are being invited to take part in a decorating contest depicting the theme: The 12 Days of Christmas.

The judging criteria for the contest, sponsored by the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce includes, the general effect of the presentation; the craftsmanship involved in the exterior decorations including, effective use of colors and materials used; how the theme is adapted and illustrated; and originality. 

Two Turtle doves, one of last years window displays by Marten Arts Gallery.
Two Turtle Doves, last years theme window display by Marten Arts Gallery. (photo by Dennis Pal)

Each of the four judging categories, general effect in presentation, workmanship, theme and originality will be allotted five points and the winner will be based on the amount of points added from each category to a total of 20 points. The deadline for participating is Nov. 13.

Then the village will be decked out in holiday splendor for the tree lighting ceremony which will be held in Clan Gregor Square at 7 p.m. on Nov. 13. The jolly old elf, himself will make his first appearance in the village for 2009 and the Hullett Public School Choristers will add to the flavor of the evening by serenading the crowd with Christmas carols. To cap things off festive treats will be served on Main Street.

The following morning at 11 a.m. the Santa Claus Parade will make its way along Main Street complete with pipe bands, floats, horses and the Shriner’s mini cars.

Then on Sunday, Nov. 15, the Main Street shopping experience will be enhanced by some festive music.

The Christmas in Bayfield Weekend is only just the beginning as The 12 Days of Christmas will continue on Main Street with special shopping events from Nov. 21 to Dec. 13.

 

LOW WATER ADVISORY DESPITE RAIN

It would appear there has been a great deal of rainy weather recently in the Bayfield River watershed but stream flows have only increased slightly.

The Water Response Team (WRT) has responded to persistent low stream flow conditions by continuing a Level 1 Low Water Advisory for the entire watershed.


Click image to view full map (pdf file, 566KB)

Rainfall for the Bayfield River, measured at Varna from July to September was 211 mm, about 72 per cent of the expected 294 mm. Based on early October precipitation values, conditions have improved slightly but still remain within a low-water-advisory condition for both precipitation and stream flow indicators. 

Monthly stream flows in the Bayfield River were approximately 25 per cent of the normal for September.

Stream flow in local watercourses declined substantially through the summer in response to the drier than usual weather of late summer.

“Rainfall amounts, from July through September, were approximately 50 per cent of normal for each of those months with the exception of some areas in the northernmost regions of the watershed,” said Alec Scott, Water and Planning Manager with the Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority (ABCA).

He added, “With regards to stream flow, we approached this summer in a positive situation but variations in weather patterns have had profound impacts on the availability of water, to the point that some streams have dried up completely.”

The Chair of the Water Response Team (WRT), Bob Norris, said conservation of water is important to prevent further reduction in water levels.

“We generally encourage a 10 per cent voluntary reduction in water use by everyone in the identified areas based on the current conditions but with a reduced demand for water at this time of year, the low water program’s main target is general awareness of watershed conditions,” said Norris. “Everyone has an important part to play in preserving our water supply.”

October will be a pivotal month, according to the WRT. Conditions will improve if the wetter weather experienced early in October persists through the month, and the team may then be able to drop the low water advisory.

Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority (ABCA) staff will continue to monitor rainfall and stream flow data and keep the public informed of any changes in watershed conditions. Visit www.ontario.ca/lowwater for further resources on the Ontario Low Water Response Program. 

"We generally encourage a 10 per cent 
voluntary reduction in water use. "

ANGLICAN CHURCH

Operation Christmas Child is a tradition at Trinity Anglican Church and the latest campaign commenced on Oct. 25.

Participants are asked to take a box and fill it with gifts and necessities for either a boy or girl in one of three age categories: 2-4, 5-9 or 10-14. Instructions are provided as to what will and won’t be accepted in the box; a well-balanced selection of such items as, school supplies, hygiene items, small gifts and toys are acceptable. A donation of $7 per box is also appreciated as this helps with shipping costs.

This year boxes from Trinity and churches throughout Southwestern Ontario will go to Argentina, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissua, Haiti, Cote d’Ivoire, Nicaragua, Senegal, Sierre Leone and Uruguay.

Filled boxes should be returned to Trinity on or before Nov. 15 as they will be blessed at the church service that morning.   The congregation hopes to fill 100 shoeboxes as part of this Samaritan’s Purse project.

Trinity will also be helping those in need on a local level as well. Gifts of food, toys and clothing will be collected for the Huron County Christmas Bureau on White Gift Sunday, Nov. 29. In addition, there will also be a Children’s Clothing Tree set up in the parish hall on which people can attach mitts, hats, scarves and pajamas, all of which will be donated to the bureau.

The next Men’s Breakfast has been schedule for Nov. 14 at 8:30 a.m. at the church. 

PRESBYTERIAN 

Ron and Jean Sangster have been two very devoted members of Knox Presbyterian Church and the community will be saddened to learn that they are moving to Stratford in early December.

To recognize their many years of ministry at Knox, the congregation will be holding a pot luck lunch in their honor on Nov. 1 following the worship service.


UNITED CHURCH

It’s the time of year when local choirs dust off their Christmas carol books to prepare for the festive season.

The choir at St. Andrew’s United Church is now holding practices for their Christmas Carol Service on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. Paul Howe will be conducting the annual service this year and all in the community are invited to join the choir, no matter their denomination.

The membership of St. Andrew’s invites all in the community to celebrate the bounty of the season with them on Nov. 7. St. Andrew’s will be holding their annual Harvest Dinner at the Bayfield Community Centre starting at 4:30 p.m.

Tickets are available now for $13, adults; and $6 for children, aged six to 10 years. Please phone 519 565-2479 for tickets.

Looking ahead, the St. Andrew’s United Church Women will hold their annual Christmas Holly Bazaar on the Christmas in Bayfield Weekend.

The event will be held at St. Andrew’s on Nov. 13 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Organizers report that there will be a wonderful selection of items available made and donated by the talented members of the Bayfield Sunshine Coast Quilters Guild. Items include dolls, pillows, table runners, scarves, quilts, and bags – certainly something for all on your shopping list. 


FILM SOCIETY

Paschendale is the third of four films brought to the village for the fall series by The Bayfield Film Society. It will be shown at the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m.

The final theatrical offering for the season will be Stone of Destiny on Dec. 10.

Individual show tickets may be purchased at the door for $10 each.

For ticket inquiries please contact Lynne Gillians at 519 565-5884 or email lynnegillians@hotmail.com


HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

The Bayfield and Area Horticultural Society (BAHS) will hold their Annual General Meeting on Nov. 16.

It will be held at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building starting at 7:30 p.m. The guest speakers will be Leigh and Jerry Selk who will share their knowledge of Viticulture.


TOWN HALL

All are invited to come out to the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 7, to jump and jive, swing and sway and cut a rug as The Festival City Big Band makes their annual appearance. 

This 17-piece band will provide dancing from 9 p.m. to midnight on Nov. 7. A light lunch will be served at this licensed event. 

Tickets are available now by calling Charles Kalbfleisch at 519 565-2244 or Pat Langley at 519 565-2894. Tickets are also available at Ernie King Music and The Casablanca Ballroom and Dance Studio, both in Goderich. 

The Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society appreciates the generous sponsorship of this event by OLG.


AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY

The members of the Bayfield Agricultural Society are preparing for their annual fundraiser: the making of wreaths for the Christmas season. 

The wreaths are hand made from at least four different greens collected and donated from the surrounding area.
These wreaths are made by society volunteers, and anyone else who would like to join in, during the weeks leading up to, and after (depending on orders), Christmas in Bayfield. Tails or swags are also made. The wreath making sessions will take place at Te-Em Farms and pot-luck lunches will be served. 

Wreaths and tails include red bows. Extra bows are available for $3 each.  The wreaths sell for: regular size, approx. 18 inches wide, $25; large size, up to 24 inches wide, $35; tails or swags starting at 24”, $20 and up. Custom sizes can also be created and are priced accordingly. 

Anyone wishing to volunteer to help or place an order should contact VanderWouden by email at evanderwouden@tcc.on.ca or call her at 519 482-3020. Wreaths will also be for sale in front of St. Andrew’s United Church during the Christmas in Bayfield Weekend. 


LAKE HURON LEARNING

Local individuals are enhancing the knowledge of seniors in the community by leading sessions in the Enhanced Aging Series organized by Lake Huron Learning.
 
On Nov. 4, Bayfield’s volunteer Archivist, Ralph Laviolette, will share his knowledge of the early days of Huron County and also how to begin a family search. This informative afternoon will be held from 1-3 p.m. at Goderich Place. 

The session can be attended for $15 a person. For more information please call 519 524-4154 or email info@lakehuronlearning.ca


 
TRAIL ASSOCIATION

A local art gallery and a renowned artist are offering their resources to support one of our areas greatest natural resources: the Bayfield River Valley Trail Systems.

Until Oct. 30, “Wild by Nature” an exhibition by artist, Robert Bateman, will be held at the Marten Arts Gallery on Main Street in the village.

From now until Nov. 13, raffle tickets will be sold giving people the opportunity to win a valuable, signed publisher's proof Bateman print entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.” There are only 20 of these prints in existence. The proceeds from the raffle will go to the Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) for trail development. Tickets are $10 each or three for $25. 

Tickets are available at Marten Arts, Plover's, Outside Projects, Sugar, Pharmasave Michael’s Pharmacy and Brandon Hardware.

The draw will be made at the "Lighting of the Lights" ceremony in Clan Gregor Square on the Friday night of the Christmas in Bayfield weekend.

Members of the BRVTA will automatically be entered in the draw if they renew their Trail Association Membership and fill out the required forms before Oct. 31.

For more information on the raffle and to help sell tickets please email Helen Varekamp, trail association fundraising and membership chair at hvarekamp@tcc.on.ca

 

GIRL GUIDES

Chocolatey Mint Girl Guide Cookies have arrived in Bayfield. These cookies are now available for $4 a box from members of Bayfield Guiding or the Bayfield Village Inn.

The Centenary Celebration Calendar 1910-2010, created by members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding, and for sale in Mid-western Ontario, is also available.  The calendars are selling for $10 each.

Locally, calendars are available for sale from members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding as well as The Village Book Shop, Bayfield Village Inn, Interior Trends and Drs. Haney and Van Maanen’s Dental Office in Clinton.


BRIDGE CLUB

Looking for a fun social evening? Then look know further than the Wednesday Evening Bridge Club.

The club will meet on Oct. 28 at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building. The cards will be dealt at 7 p.m. and new members are always welcome to join.  


EUCHRE CLUB

The Bayfield Euchre Club is now enjoying their fall session.

The club meets on alternate Wednesdays at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building at 7:30 p.m. They will meet next on Nov. 4.

New players are invited to come and join returning regulars. The cost is only $1.50 per person. For more information contact Lee at 519 565-2765 in the evenings.  

 
RATEPAYERS' LAUNCH NEW WEBSITE

The Bayfield Ratepayers Association (BRA) exists to represent the interests of the permanent and summer residents of the Village of Bayfield as well as to keep members informed of all matters which might affect them; with this in mind the BRA have just launched a brand new website.

The BRA would like to invite residents to visit www.bra.camp8.org and then log in, browse and blog. They would like people to share their comments, concerns and ask questions. The executive feels that they can better represent their membership if opinions are voiced.

The BRA have set their priorities for the upcoming year as follows: taxes and fair assessment, washrooms for Main Street, improving beach and marina water quality, beautification of Main Street, public library project; coordinated plan for the revitalization of Main Street including, tree replacement and municipal bylaw enforcement.

The executive would like to encourage the ratepayers in Bayfield to fill out and submit the Facilities Review Survey that was mailed out to each household and to add comments to the form if so desired. 

The BRA executive sits on several committees outside of the Ratepayers Association.  These committees work with other groups in the community who are interested in the betterment of the village.  The BRA is looking for volunteers from the membership who would be willing to help the executive on individual committees.  They believe that the more manpower the stronger the village’s voice.

OVER ONE HUNDRED VOICES JOIN IN SONG AT CAMPFIRE FOR GIRL GUIDES OF CANADA'S 100TH ANNIVERSARY

 

Nearly 130 people gathered around the faux campfire in the Bayfield Town Hall on the evening of Oct. 21.
Nearly 130 people gathered around the faux campfire in the Bayfield Town Hall on the evening of Oct. 21.

Bayfield Pathfinder Guider Toni Gale and Bayfield Girl Guide Nicole Greidanus enjoyed singing such songs as “It’s a Small World” and “Barges”.
Bayfield Pathfinder Guider Toni Gale and Bayfield Girl Guide Nicole Greidanus enjoyed singing such songs as “It’s a Small World” and “Barges”.

 The Sparks from Goderich were very enthusiastic when it came to singing their special song, “The Sparks are Here”. Jumping up at the appropriate cue in the song were Abby Archambault, Rosanne Field, their Guider; Addison Black-McNee and Mariah Kerr.
The Sparks from Goderich were very enthusiastic when it came to singing their special song, “The Sparks are Here”. Jumping up at the appropriate cue in the song were Abby Archambault, Rosanne Field, their Guider; Addison Black-McNee and Mariah Kerr.

Clinton members Faith Kovacs and Mackenzie Kelly-Ingram performed the actions to the old favorite, “Brownie Smile”.
Clinton members Faith Kovacs and Mackenzie Kelly-Ingram performed the actions to the old favorite, “Brownie Smile”.

“Join into the Game” is a campfire classic. Joining in on the foot stomping portion of the song were some Sparks from Exeter.
“Join into the Game” is a campfire classic. Joining in on the foot stomping portion of the song were some Sparks from Exeter.

Singing “On My Honor” these girls from Clinton, Sarah Cox, Kerry Parker and Jaymie Verhoef showed their duty to love.
Singing “On My Honor” these girls from Clinton, Sarah Cox, Kerry Parker and Jaymie Verhoef showed their duty to love.

Michelle Parker, Jaymie Verhoef, Kerry Parker and Sarah Cox were among the girls from Clinton that joined in the campfire celebration
Michelle Parker, Jaymie Verhoef, Kerry Parker and Sarah Cox were among the girls from Clinton that joined in the campfire celebration.


A large contingent from the Exeter Guiding units came to Bayfield for the campfire celebration. The Sparks were especially keen to wave their fire sticks.
A large contingent from the Exeter Guiding units came to Bayfield for the campfire celebration. The Sparks were especially keen to wave their fire sticks. 

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

Close to 130 people took part in a campfire celebration at the Bayfield Town Hall on the evening of Oct. 21 as area girls, their Guiders and families united their voices in song in celebration of the upcoming 100th anniversary for Girl Guides of Canada.

That same evening, all across the province and even in Nunavut, thousands of members and their families gathered together around campfires, both real and faux, to share in this wonderful tradition. There were 95 campfires scheduled in such places as Windsor, Iqualuit, Cornwall and Fort Frances.

For the local campfire event attendees came from Goderich, Clinton, Exeter and Bayfield units. They joined their voices to sing old campfire classics such as, “Tall Trees” and “Fire’s Burning.” These songs sounded particularly powerful when sung in rounds. The event was organized in such a way that the membership across the province would be singing the same songs at the same time.

The committee for the Bayfield campfire added some individual touches, making special “fire sticks” for the girls to wave, creating an autograph signing page in the centre of the song book to collect the signatures of both new and old friends; and a snack of s’more squares – because it wouldn’t be a Girl Guide campfire without s’mores. 
 

 This young Spark from Exeter adapted her fire stick into a lovely hair accessory.
This young Spark from Exeter adapted her fire stick into a lovely hair accessory.

What would a campfire be without a little dancing? Just don’t get to close to the “flames”.
What would a campfire be without a little dancing? Just don’t get to close to the “flames”.

Bayfield Pathfinders, Brayden Knox and Amber Brandon (right) shared a laugh during a light hearted moment
Bayfield Pathfinders, Brayden Knox and Amber Brandon (right) shared a laugh during a light hearted moment

Michelle Parker and Savannah Muscat, both Guides from Clinton, enjoyed the actions to “Ram Sam Sam”.
Michelle Parker and Savannah Muscat, both Guides from Clinton, enjoyed the actions to “Ram Sam Sam”.

They joined their voices
 to sing old campfire classics such as, “Tall Trees” and “Fire’s Burning.”

Ninety-five campfires were held across the province on Oct. 21. The event was designed so that participants would be singing the same songs at the same time. Bayfield, Clinton and Goderich joined their faux campfires to make one large flame symbolic of the sisterhood of Guiding.
Ninety-five campfires were held across the province on Oct. 21. The event was designed so that participants would be singing the same songs at the same time. Bayfield, Clinton and Goderich joined their faux campfires to make one large flame symbolic of the sisterhood of Guiding.

 

SUBMISSIONS

Ask anyone who knows me and they will tell you I like to be busy - too busy some would say.

“I love a good deadline” is one of my most common sayings. Perhaps it was those years working for a newspaper that instilled this trait.

However, one of my pet peeves is hearing people say, “I can’t wait till this is over with.”

Okay, if the phrase is being said before a doctor’s physical appointment or a mathematics exam I concur. But if it is being used regarding an event such as, a wedding or a charity function you’re volunteering with, than I take exception. Savor these moments, remember to breathe and take a mental picture – they are what comprise your life and that is something that should be celebrated every day no matter how busy you find yourself.

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome. Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m. Please email me at bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443. Hope to see you online soon at www.villageofbayfield.com - Melody

 

 

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Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder