Nov. 4, 2009


Week 45 Issue 18

ENTRANCE IMPROVEMENTS TO HALL TO FEATURE ENGRAVED PAVESTONES 

BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

It has been 20 years since a committee was formed to save the Bayfield Town Hall from demolition. Since that time a number of fundraising efforts have been held in an effort to preserve it and make it a vital part of the community social scene.


The Bayfield Town Hall as painted by Josh McClinchey

Now The Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society is looking to improve the entrance to the building to make it more visibly appealing for weddings, festivals, concerts and business meetings.

The latest fundraiser will be the sale of commemorative bricks to be installed in the front walk, at the hall entrance and a new walk leading to the property’s “great lawn”.

The paving stones can be engraved to showcase a family name, honor loved ones or celebrate a special occasion such as a wedding or an anniversary. They could even make a unique family Christmas gift.


A sketch of plans for improvements to entrance of Bayfield Town Hall.

According to the fundraising brochure, “These stones will be placed along the walkway so that generations to come will enjoy this wonderful legacy left in honor of the revitalization of the town hall.”

There are three stone styles to purchase: a large stone, 8X12, with one line of engraving up to 12 characters, $250; a medium stone, 8X8, with one line of engraving up to 12 characters, $100; and a place holder, 4X8, no engraving, $50.  Tax receipts will be provided. Cheques can be made payable to The Bayfield Town Hall and mailed to PO Box 2078, Bayfield ON, N0M 1G0.

Organizations, school classes, businesses and corporations are encouraged to be part of this worthwhile community project.

The society hopes to have the brickwork installed in the spring of next year. 
 

MERCHANTS INVITED TO DECORATE

With less than two weeks remaining before the Christmas season begins in Bayfield – businesses and restaurants are being invited to take part in a decorating contest depicting the theme: The 12 Days of Christmas.

Upside down Christmas Tree at Marten Arts Gallery courtyard in 2006
Upside down Christmas Tree at Marten Arts Gallery courtyard in 2006 (photo by Dennis Pal)

The judging criteria for the contest, sponsored by the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce includes, the general effect of the presentation; the craftsmanship involved in the exterior decorations including, effective use of colors and materials used; how the theme is adapted and illustrated; and originality. 

Each of the four judging categories, general effect in presentation, workmanship, theme and originality will be allotted five points and the winner will be based on the amount of points added from each category to a total of 20 points.

Then the village will be decked out in holiday splendor for the tree lighting ceremony which will be held in Clan Gregor Square at 7 p.m. on Nov. 13. The jolly old elf, himself will make his first appearance in the village for 2009 and the Hullett Public School Choristers will add to the flavor of the evening by serenading the crowd with Christmas carols. To cap things off festive treats will be served on Main Street.

The following morning at 11 a.m. the Santa Claus Parade will make its way along Main Street complete with pipe bands, floats, horses and the Shriner’s mini cars.

Then on Sunday, Nov. 15, the Main Street shopping experience will be enhanced by some festive music.

The Christmas in Bayfield Weekend is only just the beginning as The 12 Days of Christmas will continue on Main Street with special shopping events from Nov. 21 to Dec. 13. 
 

SEASON OF GIVING NOW UNDERWAY

Operation Christmas Child is a tradition at Trinity Anglican Church and the latest campaign commenced on Oct. 25.

Participants are asked to take a box and fill it with gifts and necessities for either a boy or girl in one of three age categories: 2-4, 5-9 or 10-14. Instructions are provided as to what will and won’t be accepted in the box; a well-balanced selection of such items as, school supplies, hygiene items, small gifts and toys are acceptable. A donation of $7 per box is also appreciated as this helps with shipping costs.

This year boxes from Trinity and churches throughout Southwestern Ontario will go to Argentina, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissua, Haiti, Cote d’Ivoire, Nicaragua, Senegal, Sierre Leone and Uruguay.

Filled boxes should be returned to Trinity on or before Nov. 15 as they will be blessed at the church service that morning.   The congregation hopes to fill 100 shoeboxes as part of this Samaritan’s Purse project.

Trinity will also be helping those in need on a local level as well. Gifts of food, toys and clothing will be collected for the Huron County Christmas Bureau on White Gift Sunday, Nov. 29. In addition, there will also be a Children’s Clothing Tree set up in the parish hall on which people can attach mitts, hats, scarves and pajamas, all of which will be donated to the bureau.

The next Men’s Breakfast has been schedule for Nov. 14 at 8:30 a.m. at the church.

Looking ahead, the next Sundays at Eleven Program will be held in the parish hall on Nov. 29. A representative from Rural Response for Healthy Children will speak about the community action program they offer for youngsters in our area.

Lighten the Load for a Loonie-a-day is an initiative of Trinity’s Fundraising Committee. The congregation is encouraged to pick up a little paper bag from the basket in the parish hall and place a loonie in it each day until the return date of Dec. 6. This project was run successfully last year and it is hoped that this season’s venture will be just as lucrative in assisting with the parish finances.


HARVEST DINNER SERVED SATURDAY

The membership of St. Andrew’s United Church invites all in the community to celebrate the bounty of the season with them on Nov. 7. St. Andrew’s will be holding their annual Harvest Dinner at the Bayfield Community Centre starting at 4:30 p.m.

Tickets are available now for $13, adults; and $6 for children, aged six to 10 years. Please phone 519 565-2479 for tickets.

The St. Andrew’s United Church Women will hold their annual Christmas Holly Bazaar on the Christmas in Bayfield Weekend.

The event will be held at St. Andrew’s on Nov. 13 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Organizers report that there will be a wonderful selection of items available made and donated by the talented members of the Bayfield Sunshine Coast Quilters Guild. Items include dolls, pillows, table runners, scarves, quilts, and bags – certainly something for all on your shopping list.

It’s the time of year when local choirs dust off their Christmas carol books to prepare for the festive season.The choir at St. Andrew’s is now holding holiday practices for their Christmas Carol Service on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. It is not too late to join the choir for the special candlelight service performance to be held on Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m.

St. Andrew’s will host their annual Hanging of the Greens party on Dec. 5 starting at 4:30 p.m. At this event the 3Ms Group presides over the decorating of the church for the Christmas season. A potluck supper and sing-a-long of Christmas carols follows the decking of the halls.

White Gift Sunday will be held on Dec. 6 at St. Andrew’s. Financial gifts will be shared with the Bluewater Centre for Youth and the Huron County Christmas Bureau. Gifts may be brought in suitable bags but should be unwrapped. 
 

REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICES

On the morning of Nov. 8, all in the community are invited to gather at the cenotaph in Clan Gregor Square and take a moment to remember.

Bayfield’s Remembrance Day services are held on the Sunday prior to Nov. 11, when musicians and clergy can avail themselves to the smaller centers.

Local dignitaries, representatives from the Clinton Legion and members of Bayfield Guiding and Zurich Scouting will parade up to the square from the top of Main Street just prior to 11 a.m. for the service in the square.

Following the outdoor service, the parade participants will make their way to St. Andrew’s United Church to take part in the church service to be held there.


REMEMBER ME?

There are countless photographs of people in the Bayfield Historical Society’s Archives collection, but sadly their names were never recorded. In this section we will showcase an image with the hopes that one of our subscribers might be able to identify the individual(s) in the photo. Please email your information to the Editor’s attention at the address listed near the bottom of the page in “Submissions”.

In this week’s “REMEMBER ME?” we have a photo taken in front of Edwards Dry Good Store in the early 1900s. Some may by more familiar with the building as it stands now – The Black Dog Village Pub and Bistro. This photo will grace the cover of the soon-to-be published walking tour of Bayfield. Village Archivist, Ralph Laviolette reports that lots of folk ask if these men were residents or summer visitors. Anyone remember them?


This is a landscape taken in the Bannockburn Conservation Area on an autumn day a couple years ago.
Close up of men seen in front of Edwards Cash Store. Click image to see larger version pop-up. 

Jeremy Mussche, of Landmark Structures, takes a moment during the lift to wave to the photographer 145 feet below.
HELLO DOWN THERE

Jeremy Mussche, of Landmark Structures, takes a moment during the lift to wave to the photographer 145 feet below.


HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

The Bayfield and Area Horticultural Society (BAHS) will hold their Annual General Meeting on Nov. 16. Elections will be held to put into place a slate of officers to oversee the 31st year of the organization. The membership can look forward to another great season of gardening both in the community and at home.

The meeting will be held at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building starting at 7:30 p.m. The guest speakers will be Leigh and Jerry Selk who will share their knowledge of Viticulture.
 

PRESBYTERIAN

This year spectators at the upcoming Santa Claus Parade will be well fed due to the efforts of Knox Presbyterian Church.

The church will be holding a barbecue on their lawn at the top of Main Street across from Clan Gregor Square from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The parade will pass by this location shortly after 11 a.m.

Barbecued hot dogs and sausages, plus chili and a bun, popcorn and hot drinks will be on the menu. Popular condiments, fried onions and sauerkraut will also be offered.
 

TRAIL ASSOCIATION

There is just a little over a week left for individuals to purchase their raffle tickets on the one-of-a-kind work of art and support the Bayfield River Valley Trail Systems in the process. 
From now until Nov. 13, raffle tickets will be sold giving people the opportunity to win a valuable, signed publisher's proof Bateman print entitled, “First Arrival – Killdeer.” There are only 20 of these prints in existence. The proceeds from the raffle will go to the Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) for trail development. Tickets are $10 each or three for $25. 

Tickets are available at Marten Arts, Plover's, Outside Projects, Sugar, Pharmasave Michael’s Pharmacy and Brandon Hardware.

The draw will be made at the "Lighting of the Lights" ceremony in Clan Gregor Square on the Friday night of the Christmas in Bayfield weekend.

For more information on the raffle and to help sell tickets please email Helen Varekamp, trail association fundraising and membership chair at hvarekamp@tcc.on.ca .
 

GIRL GUIDES

Chocolatey Mint Girl Guide Cookies have arrived in Bayfield. These cookies are now available for $4 a box from members of Bayfield Guiding or the Bayfield Village Inn.

The Centenary Celebration Calendar 1910-2010, created by members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding, and for sale in Mid-western Ontario, is also available.  The calendars are selling for $10 each.

Locally, calendars are available for sale from members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding as well as The Village Book Shop, Bayfield Village Inn, Interior Trends and Drs. Haney and Van Maanen’s Dental Office in Clinton.
 

TOWN HALL

All are invited to come out to the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 7, to jump and jive, swing and sway and cut a rug as The Festival City Big Band makes their annual appearance.

This 17-piece band will provide dancing from 9 p.m. to midnight on Nov. 7. A light lunch will be served at this licensed event.

Tickets are available now by calling Charles Kalbfleisch at 519 565-2244 or Pat Langley at 519 565-2894. Tickets are also available at Ernie King Music and The Casablanca Ballroom and Dance Studio, both in Goderich.

The Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society appreciates the generous sponsorship of this event by OLG. 
 

OPTIMIST'S RAFFLE NOW UNDERWAY

A beautiful handcrafted chest filled to overflowing with toys for boys and girls of all ages may sound like a holiday dream but for one lucky person it will be reality come Dec. 13.

Once again the Bayfield Optimist Club will raffle off a handcrafted wooden toy chest filled to the brim with toys. This was the Christmas 2007 version - the 2009 version will be unveiled on Christmas in Bayfield weekend, but tickets are available now. (Melody Falconer-Pounder photo)
Once again the Bayfield Optimist Club will raffle off a handcrafted wooden toy chest filled to the brim with toys. This was the Christmas 2007 version - the 2009 version will be unveiled on Christmas in Bayfield weekend, but tickets are available now. (Melody Falconer-Pounder photo)

The Bayfield Optimist Club is once again holding a raffle on a hand made and hand painted wooden toy chest filled with Christmas wishes. The chest replete with toys will be unveiled at the Christmas in Bayfield weekend festivities but tickets are available now from Optimist members and at the Bayfield Village Inn.

Toy chest tickets are $2 each or three for $5. The draw on the chest will be made at Breakfast with Santa on Dec. 13.
 
 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY

The members of the Bayfield Agricultural Society are preparing for their annual fundraiser: the making of wreaths for the Christmas season.

The wreaths are hand made from at least four different greens collected and donated from the surrounding area.
These wreaths are made by society volunteers, and anyone else who would like to join in, during the weeks leading up to, and after (depending on orders), Christmas in Bayfield. Tails or swags are also made. The wreath making sessions will take place at Te-Em Farms and pot-luck lunches will be served.

Wreaths and tails include red bows. Extra bows are available for $3 each.  The wreaths sell for: regular size, approx. 18 inches wide, $25; large size, up to 24 inches wide, $35; tails or swags starting at 24”, $20 and up. Custom sizes can also be created and are priced accordingly.

Anyone wishing to volunteer to help or place an order should contact VanderWouden by email at evanderwouden@tcc.on.ca or call her at 519 482-3020. Wreaths will also be for sale in front of St. Andrew’s United Church during the Christmas in Bayfield Weekend.
 

BRIDGE CLUB

Helen Carson and Lillian Martin were the high scorers when the Wednesday Evening Bridge Club members gathered for cards on Oct. 28.

The club will meet on Nov. 11 at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building. The cards will be dealt at 7 p.m. and new members are always welcome to join. 
  

EUCHRE CLUB

The Bayfield Euchre Club is now enjoying their fall session.

The club meets on alternate Wednesdays at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building at 7:30 p.m. They will meet next on Nov. 4.

New players are invited to come and join returning regulars. The cost is only $1.50 per person. For more information contact Lee at 519 565-2765 in the evenings. 
 

FILM SOCIETY

Paschendale is the third of four films brought to the village for the fall series by The Bayfield Film Society. It will be shown at the Bayfield Town Hall on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m.

The final theatrical offering for the season will be Stone of Destiny on Dec. 10.

Individual show tickets may be purchased at the door for $10 each.

For ticket inquiries please contact Lynne Gillians at 519 565-5884 or email lynnegillians@hotmail.com.
 

CROQUET CLUB

Wondering what the Bayfield International Croquet Club has been up to of late? Look no further than the organization’s newly created website – visit www.bicc.ca

The site created by Mary-Beth Larone is the place to go for tournament schedules, scores and general information as well as the results of the 2009 season.

Members of the club will no doubt find this site the place to visit for all the croquet happenings when the new season begins in 2010.  

UP SHE RISES: MUNICIPALITY OF BLUEWATER'S BAYFIELD WATER TOWER HOISTED ON THE AFTERNOON OF OCT. 21

 

Everyone seemed to be in good spirits on the work site the morning of Oct. 21. The tower was scheduled to begin its rise at noon. Rob Arbour, of Landmark, (second from left) shares a laugh with members of the steel crew.
Everyone seemed to be in good spirits on the work site the morning of Oct. 21. The tower was scheduled to begin its rise at noon. Rob Arbour, of Landmark, (second from left) shares a laugh with members of the steel crew.

An employee with Engineered Coatings Ltd. of Ayr, ON put the finishing touches on the backside of the tower on Wednesday morning. The tower proclaims “Municipality of Bluewater Bayfield” in a splendid blue and white.

An employee with Engineered Coatings Ltd. of Ayr, ON put the finishing touches on the backside of the tower on Wednesday morning. The tower proclaims “Municipality of Bluewater Bayfield” in a splendid blue and white.
An employee with Engineered Coatings Ltd. of Ayr, ON put the finishing touches on the backside of the tower on Wednesday morning. The tower proclaims “Municipality of Bluewater Bayfield” in a splendid blue and white.

Rev. Charles Love and Art Dadd, both of Bayfield, settled in for the afternoon’s entertainment across the road from the work site on Mill Road.
Rev. Charles Love and Art Dadd, both of Bayfield, settled in for the afternoon’s entertainment across the road from the work site on Mill Road.

The crowd waxed and waned throughout the afternoon but several people remained true to the entire process. Watching from a great vantage point across the road from the work site were: Bob and Carol Campbell, Bruce Koehler, Marg Bowers, Grace Koehler, Elaine Dunn and Bob Bowers.
The crowd waxed and waned throughout the afternoon but several people remained true to the entire process. Watching from a great vantage point across the road from the work site were: Bob and Carol Campbell, Bruce Koehler, Marg Bowers, Grace Koehler, Elaine Dunn and Bob Bowers.

Clarence Doherty, (right) Site Inspector from B.M. Ross and Associates in Goderich, was on hand to watch the water tower go up. Here, he talks to a paint inspector.
Clarence Doherty, (right) Site Inspector from B.M. Ross and Associates in Goderich, was on hand to watch the water tower go up. Here, he talks to a paint inspector.

Provincial inspectors visited the site en masse over the course of the afternoon.
Provincial inspectors visited the site en masse over the course of the afternoon.

Pat Graham, of Bayfield, was in discussion with Lori Wolf, CAO for the Municipality of Bluewater, and Jim Ferguson, councilor-at-large during the tower hoist.
Pat Graham, of Bayfield, was in discussion with Lori Wolf, CAO for the Municipality of Bluewater, and Jim Ferguson, councilor-at-large during the tower hoist.

 

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

There was some excitement out on Mill Road on Wednesday afternoon; people brought lawn chairs, coffee and hotdogs were served, drivers pulled over to the side of the road and cameras snapped a thousand images. Well, it’s not everyday you can watch a water tower being hoisted 145 feet (44 meters) into the air.

The paint may not have been quite dry on the Municipality of Bluewater’s Bayfield Water Tower when it began its accent shortly after noon. A painter from, Engineered Coatings Ltd., of Ayr, ON, put the finishing touches on the letters “LD” (for Bayfield) and was then safely backed away as the supports were removed from the base.

The tank itself weighs 132 tons, or 263,270 lbs. It was hoisted by 24 cables using hydraulic jacks and the word circulating in the crowd that gathered was that these jacks lifted the tank approximately nine inches at a time. 

The designer and builder of the water tower was Landmark Structures Co., whose Canadian base of operations is in Burlington. The company was founded in this country in 1974 as a specialty engineering and contracting company.

According to their website, they “transformed water storage with the introduction of the composite elevated tank, combining a reinforced concrete pedestal and welded steel tank.”

The Bayfield Water Tower can hold 880,000 Imperial Gallons (4,000 m3) and is 75 feet (23 meters) in diameter. 

The consulting engineer on the project was B.M. Ross and Associates of Goderich. 

Tom Saulnier, of Landmark Structures, was one of four men working at the top of the tower during the hoist. Here, he smiles at the spectators that gathered below to watch their very precise work.
Tom Saulnier, of Landmark Structures, was one of four men working at the top of the tower during the hoist. Here, he smiles at the spectators that gathered below to watch their very precise work.

A member of the steel crew removed the supports at the base of the tank. It began its accent, which took about three hours, shortly thereafter.
A member of the steel crew removed the supports at the base of the tank. It began its accent, which took about three hours, shortly thereafter. 

During the afternoon, people driving past the site, would stop their cars and watch the process for a while.
During the afternoon, people driving past the site, would stop their cars and watch the process for a while.

Tower neighbors, John and Kathleen Siertsema, provided the crowd that gathered to watch the tower hoist with hotdogs and coffee. Marg and Bob Bowers seemed to be enjoying the dinner and show.
Tower neighbors, John and Kathleen Siertsema, provided the crowd that gathered to watch the tower hoist with hotdogs and coffee. Marg and Bob Bowers seemed to be enjoying the dinner and show.

It wouldn’t be a neighborhood event without hospitality and the Siertsema’s offered plenty. They provided piping hot coffee to those who felt the slight chill in the air. Here, Hilda Gerger, of Bayfield, carries a mug and one for a friend.
It wouldn’t be a neighborhood event without hospitality and the Siertsema’s offered plenty. They provided piping hot coffee to those who felt the slight chill in the air. Here, Hilda Gerger, of Bayfield, carries a mug and one for a friend.

A close-up look at the artwork on the tower.
A close-up look at the artwork on the tower.

The entrance to John and Kathleen Siertsema’s Mill Road home was the place to be on the afternoon of the tower hoist.
The entrance to John and Kathleen Siertsema’s Mill Road home was the place to be on the afternoon of the tower hoist.

Gord Blake (left) and Tom Saulnier, both with Landmark Structures, work far above the ground as the tank rises, soon they will be working from inside the tank as it is lifted above their heads.
Gord Blake (left) and Tom Saulnier, both with Landmark Structures, work far above the ground as the tank rises, soon they will be working from inside the tank as it is lifted above their heads.

One, two, three...lift!

The Municipality of Bluewater’s Bayfield Water Tower was hoisted on the afternoon of Oct. 21. It was designed and built by Landmark Structures, of Burlington, ON. According to their website, they “transformed water storage with the introduction of the composite elevated tank, combining a reinforced concrete pedestal and welded steel tank.” Images one thru four demonstrate how the tower looked as it was hoisted starting at noon to about 3 p.m.


 

SUBMISSIONS

Progress was something in the forefront of my mind this week. The reason was two-fold. First came the hoisting of the Bayfield Water Tower. As the pictures hopefully demonstrate, I was out on the side of Mill Road for almost three hours capturing images and chatting with others who stopped by to have a look. A water tower for Bayfield, and fire hydrants too, now that is progress.

The second reason was a little family project I was involved in – my mother-in-law’s 80th birthday celebration.  I created little one page time capsules of information for each table at the dinner – each table representing a different decade.  I learned a lot about progress from that project. The most inspiring perhaps was that my mother-in-law came into this world just seven days after women were legally declared persons in this country. Now that is progress indeed…

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome. Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m. Please email me at bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443. Hope to see you online soon at www.villageofbayfield.com - Melody

 

 

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Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder