Bookmark and Share    Dec. 23, 2009    Week 52 Issue 25

ORPHANAGE LOVING ENVIRONMENT FOR POOREST OF POOR IN HAITI

STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

Children having birthdays while at the orphanage are celebrated. They get to wear a special crown. (Submitted photo)
Birthdays at the orphanage are celebrated. Children get to wear a special crown for the day. (Submitted photo)

“I then went across the hall to the Lion room, which was by far the largest room in the house. Two year-old children slept and played here…This is where the volunteers are a great help. The two year-olds are especially entertaining. They are all crowded around me and, before I knew it, I had a little hand around each one of my fingers and hanging onto my skirt. With smiles on tiny faces that would light up the night, the warmth and innocence of these children shone through, proving to me that this was a very loving environment for the poorest of the poor in Haiti.”

In February 2006, Johanna Steegstra, of Bayfield, made a solo trip to the Children of the Promise (COTP) Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti. The above words were transcribed in her journal kept over the three weeks she volunteered there. These initial thoughts would leave a lasting impression and inspire her to return, along with five others, in January 2010.

“My first trip in 2006 changed my view on a lot of things,” she said. “I am a registered nurse and I wanted to do some volunteer work and the orphanage proved to be the perfect venue.”

The upcoming trip will last just over a week, starting Jan. 23, as some of the volunteers can take limited time off from work. The volunteers are: Linda Leblanc, Mary Hay, Bernice Hoftyzer, Jalisa Terpstra and Melody van Dorp.

Fifty children, aged two and under, are cared for at the Children of the Promise Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti. The goal is to return them to their community or a family member when they reach the age of two but many have to be adopted out as the families are often too poor to keep them. (Submitted photo)
Fifty children, aged two and under, are cared for at the Children of the Promise Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti. The goal is to return them to their community or a family member when they reach the age of two but many have to be adopted out as the families are often too poor to keep them. (Submitted photo)

“We will be there to help not to take over. It is a policy of the orphanage that as volunteers you must have a baby on you at all times to give them the attention they crave,” Steegstra said.

She added that volunteering “is not for the faint of heart.
Your day is constant; it starts at 6 a.m. and goes to 8 p.m. You are feeding, changing and bathing babies in cold water, taking care of hygiene, providing play therapy and mental stimulation. You share a room with bunk beds and take cold showers.” 

Two of the women in the group are also registered nurses. So, as Steegstra learned on her first visit, they will be asked to help with daily health assessments on all the babies.

“As clean as the place is, infections spread very easily. If one child gets an ear infection or has a skin problem, you can be sure it will go through the rest of the orphanage. Prevention and maintenance is ongoing, therefore daily assessments of the children are very important.”

They will also be asked to assist those people in the community who arrive at the orphanage gates with medical issues. From cuts and scrapes to conjunctivitis and cellulites, Steegstra offered care with the supplies available at the home or delivered the person to the closest hospital with the necessary supplies and money needed to be treated there.

“So many people from the community benefit from the presence of the orphanage. It is wonderful to realize that benevolence is the motive that supports it,” she said.

The fifty children under the age of two at COTP are cared for by nannies from the local community. The nannies work a 24-hour shift, they start at 8 a.m. and stay until 8 a.m. the next morning, to help provide consistency for the children. The women are picked up at their home and also returned. They earn $1 a day which is the equivalent of a man’s wage in Haiti.

Steegstra was very impressed with the nannies. “Never once did I see harshness toward the babies,” she said. 

She also marveled at how well behaved the children are, “Imagine about 15, two year-olds sitting around a table and not eating until all the children have their snack.”

COTP was started in the late 1990s, by Bud and Jan Bonnema, of Minnesota, US, as a non-profit organization to help infants and young children in need overseas. In 2000, the couple adopted a Haitian orphan and a year later their interfaith Christian organization was expanded to include an orphanage in Haiti. The couple is now building a second home in Indonesia and have plans for a third in Africa.

As Steegstra explains the orphanage relies solely on donations for what they can provide. She expects to see a lot of improvements on this visit from what was there just four years ago.

 
The children are cared for by Nannies from the local community. They work in 24-hour shifts and are paid $1 a day, the equivalent of a man's wage in Haiti. (Submitted photo)
The children are cared for by Nannies from the local community. They work in 24-hour shifts and are paid $1 a day, the equivalent of a man's wage in Haiti. (Submitted photo) 

“They now have an intensive care unit, so that high needs babies can enter right away,” she said.

It is the goal of COTP to be able to return the children back to their community or a family member when they are between the ages of two and three or they are adopted out.

“In some situations if the mother is dead, a family member or the father will take the child back if they are able to do so once the child reaches the age of two,” said Steegstra.

The home also provides a full care formula program for families who want to keep their children and the education of the local alumni is also often sponsored.

Steegstra commented that those who aren’t able to physically volunteer at the orphanage can support it by giving what they can. She added that local community support for this upcoming trip has been overwhelming.

“All we here on the news is the bad stuff but good stuff can snowball too and we should emphasize that,” she said.

Some of the good stuff is happening right here in Steegstra’s hometown of Bayfield. Local resident, Judith Higgs, and her daughter, Tara, of London, hosted two baby showers this fall promoting the project and collecting items that the women can carry directly to Haiti for the orphans.

An oldtimer’s hockey team in Goderich donated money so that the women could buy six hockey bags on wheels to pack the donations in to transport them to the island nation.

Steegstra’s church, Trinity Christian Reform in Goderich, also collected $1,600 to send with the women. 

Pictured is the "boat" room at the orphanage, named for the murals of boats and fish painted in soft blues, yellow and greens. Two nannies, look after the children aged nine to 18 months that call this room home. Everything at the orphanage from cribs to bibs was supplied through donations given by supporters of COTP. (Submitted photos)
Pictured is the "boat" room at the orphanage, named for the murals of boats and fish painted in soft blues, yellow and greens. Two nannies, look after the children aged nine to 18 months that call this room home. Everything at the orphanage from cribs to bibs was supplied through donations given by supporters of COTP. (Submitted photos)

The women making the trip will travel with only a small back-pack full of personal items and they will depart with all but the clothes on their backs as they will leave any other items of clothing etc. for the Haitians.

The trip has been a year in the making as all volunteers have to go through screening, provide three references and set a firm date for their trip. Plus personal schedules had to be organized. 

In 2006, Steegstra visited Haiti during their elections, it was a very unstable time and for part of the trip the airports in the country were closed to traffic. Although this concerned her three children and five grandchildren back in N.A. she said she felt safe while she was there. The orphanage itself is surrounded by 12 foot walls and all the windows and doors to both the orphanage and the volunteers’ house are padlocked and covered with wrought iron, plus there were two large guard dogs at the front gates.

Despite all these “deterrents”, the volunteers were encouraged to take the children for walks outside the compound.

“Strangely enough, it was safe to do so because everyone in the community watches out for the children,” she said.

People here at home can also watch out for these children and are invited to donate to COTP via their website:
http://www.childrenofthepromise.org/new/New_Web/donate.asp or by mail to: COTP-Canada, c/o J. and M. DeJonge, 995 Concession 2, RR #1 Selkirk, ON, N0A 1P0

 

LOVING TOUCH WORKS WONDERS

Johanna Steegstra, kept a journal of her first trip to Children of the Promise Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti; the following is an excerpt from this journal:

The infants and toddlers at the Children of Promise Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti thrive on the touch and attention of volunteers. Johanna Steegstra, of Bayfield, volunteered at the orphange in 2006 and she was assigned Herlandie (Lansey), the nine month-old baby seated on her lap was only nine pounds when she first took her under her "wing". (Submitted photo)
The infants and toddlers at the Children of Promise Infant Home in Cap-Hatien, Haiti thrive on the touch and attention of volunteers. Johanna Steegstra, of Bayfield, volunteered at the orphange in 2006 and she was assigned Herlandie (Lansey), the nine month-old baby seated on her lap was only nine pounds when she first took her under her "wing". (Submitted photo)

On my first day at the orphanage, I was asked to take Lansay (Herlandie) under my “wing”.

Her 18 year-old aunt had brought her to the orphanage. Lansay’s mother died of AIDS when the baby was five months old. Lansay was not eating or drinking and was losing weight, so they took her to the hospital where she had been diagnosed with anthrax (from sleeping on goat skins) and bacterial meningitis. Her body had been covered with sores and she still had the scars to prove it, especially around her mouth. They did not expect her to live, but as miracles do occur, she survived and came back to the orphanage weighing nine pounds at nine months.

She would not smile or cry. The first day I held her almost constantly and she started to drink. I bathed her (in warm water that I heated on the stove in my cabin), fed her, changed her and put lotion on her dry little body. I massaged her legs and arms, which were so weak. She could not even hold a bottle or put weight on her legs. I talked to her and sang to her. On the third day, she smiled at me and I was very smitten. Then she put her hands on my face and talked to me.

It was Sunday, and the volunteers and some staff, were all sitting on lawn chairs under a tree chatting. Everyone was amazed to see her doing this.

“Look at her, she never even smiled before,” said Mary, the student nurse.

“She is actually trying to talk to you,” said another one of the volunteers.

I kept encouraging Lansay by talking back to her. The others started encouraging her as well. She had these little ways to connect with a person, but you needed to be patient and wait for it to happen. She saw and watched everything and everyone.

She is a tremendously gentle soul. I knew I would miss her dearly and, if there was a child I would take home with me, it would have been her. She taught me so much in the short time that I had the privilege of knowing her. I will never forget those dark eyes and the way she spoke to me in her baby talk.

Four years later, Herlandie is a very happy and pleasingly plump toddler living with her adopted family in Michigan. 

BABY SHOWERS HELP ORPHANED CHILDREN

Nearly a thousand baby items from tiny shoes to receiving blankets were donated in two Haiti Baby Showers organized by Judith Higgs of Bayfield and her daughter, Tara O'Hagan, of London.

Judith Higgs, of Bayfield, and her daughter, Tara O'Hagan, of London, held Haiti Baby Showers in their perspective communities, collecting nearly a 1,000 items for the COTP. Johanna Steegstra, and five other volunteers, will be departing for the orphanage on Jan. 23 taking all of the donations with them. (Submitted photo)
Judith Higgs, of Bayfield, and her daughter, Tara O'Hagan, of London, held Haiti Baby Showers in their perspective communities, collecting nearly a 1,000 items for the COTP. Johanna Steegstra, and five other volunteers, will be departing for the orphanage on Jan. 23 taking all of the donations with them. (Submitted photo)

The first shower was held in London on Oct. 1 and the second followed in Bayfield on Nov. 6.

“I was pleased that Tara and I hosted the socials in our homes. It made for a much warmer and casual experience,” said Higgs.

Higgs first heard of Children of the Promise Infant Home (COTP) when Johanna Steegstra spoke as part of Trinity Anglican Church’s Sundays at Eleven Program.

 

Baby Shower Two
Judith Higgs' granddaughter, Stephanie Higgs, aged 10 years, of Toronto, helped to fold, sort and size hundreds of the baby items collected for the COTP. (Submitted photo)

 

“I found that there was a genuine response among my friends to contribute since they knew that their gift would travel directly to the volunteers and babies. So evolved the idea for some girl fun and an opportunity to contribute to the cause,” she said. “Our showers snowballed. It was a small gift from each lady but ballooned into an awesome number of articles for these little babies.”

Higgs stated that she is in awe of the contributions that Steegstra has made to COTP with both her personal time and her money.

“She represents our community so well,” she said. 

Higgs also commented that she would love to go with Steegstra on a future visit to COTP.

“I would love to go with Johanna but perhaps we did more for the orphanage staying in Bayfield. I am certain I will go in the future. However, for this trip she has five dedicated and refreshing ladies accompanying her. 

“It has been suggested that next year we should host another event for these fifty babies. I know that I will be collecting for the babies each time I see a good sale item. I think I have adopted these children as my grandbabies,” she concluded.

 

HURON TOURISM ASSOCIATION

There must be an awful lot of nice people on Santa’s list from the village and surrounding area because he keeps taking time out of his schedule to drop in to say “Ho! Ho!” on these extra busy days leading up to Dec. 25.
 

Jenna Ujiye, tourism marketer for the County of Huron, recently wrote the Bayfield Breeze to say, “Last week at the Huron Tourism Association (HTA) general meeting we had a surprise visit by Santa. He pulled up in his "new sleigh" which was decorated to the max with a lighted wreath guiding his way. The weather was snowy, but he still made it through.”

Santa Claus made a surprise appearance at the Huron Tourism Association's Christmas meeting held recently at the Brentwood on the Beach Bed and Breakfast in St. Joseph's. (Submitted photo)
Santa Claus made a surprise appearance at the Huron Tourism Association's Christmas meeting held recently at the Brentwood on the Beach Bed and Breakfast in St. Joseph's. (Submitted photo)

The HTA members were enjoying  Christmas snacks, wonderful holiday entertainment and a showing of great area culture all hosted by Joan and Peter Karstens, of Brentwood on the Beach Bed and Breakfast in St. Joseph’s.

“The evening was running smoothly when there was a knock at the door and a voice heralding, “Ho! Ho! Ho!” Santa had heard about our meeting and wanted to come. He got to the party just in time to join in on a caroling session. What a voice he has!” said Ujiye. 

Ujiye went on to say that the HTA was so happy to have such a great surprise at their meeting. The group invites all members out every year to join in on the fun and cheer at Brentwood on the Beach, but this was the first time that Santa made an appearance.
 

TOWN HALL

It has been 20 years since a committee was formed to save the Bayfield Town Hall from demolition. Since that time a number of fundraising efforts have been held in an effort to preserve it and make it a vital part of the community social scene.

Now The Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society is looking to improve the entrance to the building to make it more visibly appealing for weddings, festivals, concerts and business meetings.

The latest fundraiser will be the sale of commemorative bricks to be installed in the front walk, at the hall entrance and a new walk leading to the property’s “great lawn”.

The paving stones can be engraved to showcase a family name, honor loved ones or celebrate a special occasion such as a wedding or an anniversary. They could even make a unique family Christmas gift.

According to the fundraising brochure, “These stones will be placed along the walkway so that generations to come will enjoy this wonderful legacy left in honor of the revitalization of the town hall.”

There are three stone styles to purchase: a large stone, 8X12, with two lines of engraving up to 12 characters, $250; a medium stone, 8X8, with one line of engraving up to 12 characters, $100; and a place holder, 4X8, no engraving, $50.  Tax receipts will be provided. Cheques can be made payable to The Bayfield Town Hall and mailed to PO Box 2078, Bayfield ON, N0M 1G0. Further information can be obtained by contacting Margo Robeson at 519 565-2827.

Organizations, school classes, businesses and corporations are encouraged to be part of this worthwhile community project.

The society hopes to have the brickwork installed in the spring of next year.
 

FITNESS FUN

Just in time for those New Year’s resolutions the exercise classes held at the Bayfield Community Centre will start up again the week of Jan. 4.

The scheduled classes are: Dancefit and Toning, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m.; and Sit and Get Fit, Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:15 a.m.

Badminton will resume on Tuesday, Jan. 12 at Huron Centennial School near Brucefield. Organizers state that it is basically backyard badminton, played inside and is great exercise and lots of fun. The games are played from 7-9 p.m.

For those looking for something to exercise the mind – Mah Jongg will begin again on Thursday, Jan. 14 at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building from 1-3 p.m. If Mah Jongg isn’t your game bring one that is – Scrabble or Crib anyone?
 

ANGLICAN CHURCH

Trinity Anglican Church will be open for one final Advent Reflection Time on Dec.  23. People of all denominations are welcome to visit the church from 10 a.m. to noon; 1-3 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. for a quiet time of prayer and meditation. It will also serve as an opportunity to remember those for whom Christmas may not be a time of joy and hope.

As denotes the season, several special services are scheduled at Trinity. They are as follows: Dec. 24, 10 p.m. - Christmas Eve Candlelight Eucharist; Dec. 25, 10:30 a.m. - Christmas Day Holy Communion; Dec. 27, 9:30 a.m. - Service of Lessons and Carols.
 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

The congregation of Knox Presbyterian Church invite all in the community to attend their annual Christmas Eve Service on Dec. 24 at 7 p.m. Entitled, “A Service of Carols, Candlelight and the Christmas Story”, the evening will offer a different perspective on the traditional account as it will be told through the eyes of Mary.

BRIDGE CLUB

The Wednesday Evening Bridge Club will hold their first card games of 2010 on Jan. 6 at 7 p.m. at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building. All are welcome to join in the fun.

  GIRL GUIDES

Need last minute gifts? Chocolatey Mint Girl Guide Cookies or a Centenary Celebration Calendar may be just the items you’ve been searching for. 

There are a limited number of boxes left from Bayfield Guiding’s stock of Chocolatey Mint Girl Guide Cookies These few cartons are selling for $4 a box from members of Bayfield Guiding or the Bayfield Village Inn.

The Centenary Celebration Calendar 1910-2010, created by members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding, and for sale in Mid-western Ontario, is also available.  The calendars are selling for $10 each.

Locally, calendars are available for sale from members of Bayfield and Clinton Guiding as well as The Village Book Shop, Bayfield Village Inn, Interior Trends and Drs. Haney and Van Maanen’s Dental Office in Clinton.
 

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The Huron County Historical Society has produced an annual edition of the Huron Historical Notes for its members since 1965. And their most recent edition features the Village of Bayfield.

It is a 54-page history and contains lots of information gleaned from the Village of Bayfield text produced in the 1980s but with some notable updates. This previous work is now out-of-print.

The Bayfield Historical Society has bought 100 copies of “Huron Historical Notes – Village of Bayfield” for distribution.

Anyone wishing to purchase a copy can find the books for sale at The Bayfield Archives on Main Street or call 519 565-2454. They are selling for $8.00 to cover production and printing costs.
 

 

REMEMBER ME?

There are countless photographs of people in the Bayfield Historical Society’s Archives collection, but sadly their names were never recorded. In this section we will showcase an image with the hopes that one of our subscribers might be able to identify the individual(s) in the photo. Please email your information to the Editor’s attention at the address listed near the bottom of the page in “Submissions”.

This week we are featuring a photo of two young girls in a home-made rowboat at the Bayfield riverside in 1929. The names Viola and Netty are recorded with the photo – anyone remember them?
 Does anyone remember Viola and Nettie?
Does anyone remember Viola and Nettie?

 

In Issue 23’s “REMEMBER ME?”

This photo shows the current Bayfield Archives Building being moved across Main Street to its current location in the Spring of 1977.We shared a photo taken in the Spring of 1977. It showed the Archives Building being moved across Main Street to its present location.

Archivist Ralph Laviolette welcomed a number of responses and the following little history has been compiled:

Readers have advised that Alf Erwin's family built the building in 1893 as a business and later as a funeral parlor. After Alf Erwin died in 1924, Charles Toms bought the building and it was eventually used as a place to repair fishing nets. In 1964, it was bought by Dorothy and Harold Ormond who donated it to the Bayfield Library Assoc.  Across the street, Richard Moore, who lived in the house known as 'Fairlawn', bought Lot 175, then sold it to Jessie Metcalf who donated it to Bayfield in 1976 for a new library and community archive.  The building was moved by Phil Gemeinhardt on April 6, 1977 using a truck owned by Doug Wallace as part of the contract to build the new library/archives for the village.

The Archivist would like to thank the readers who took the time to respond to this query. 
 

Bookmark and Share  PHOTO STORY
CHRISTMAS IN BAYFIELD '09: SEASON OF LIGHT ARRIVES

The star now shines brightly over the nativity scene on display in Clan Gregor Square. This illumination first appeared atop the creche in 1998 as a memorial to  Rob Siertsema, son of John and Kathleen Sietsema of Bayfield.
The star now shines brightly over the nativity scene on display in Clan Gregor Square. This illumination first appeared atop the creche in 1998 as a memorial to  Rob Siertsema, son of John and Kathleen Siertsema of Bayfield.

 This house on Glass Street looks as though it has been torn from the pages of a holiday magazine. It truly is a feast for the eyes. 
This house on Glass Street looks as though it has been torn from the pages of a holiday magazine. It truly is a feast for the eyes. 

Many of the businesses on Main Street are decked out for the Christmas season. Inspirations store front gives off a warm and inviting glow on a crisp winter's eve.
Many of the businesses on Main Street are decked out for the Christmas season. Inspirations store front gives off a warm and inviting glow on a crisp winter's eve.

There is a chill in the air over Clan Gregor Square but the lights of the season remain warm and inviting. Visitors and family returning from afar for Christmas will delight in their ever present glow.
There is a chill in the air over Clan Gregor Square but the lights of the season remain warm and inviting. Visitors and family returning from afar for Christmas will delight in their ever present glow. 

What better outside ornament in a seafaring town than a sailboat silhouetted in festive lights? This unique decoration can be found on the lawn of a home on Hidden Valley Lane.
What better outside ornament in a seafaring town than a sailboat silhouetted in festive lights? This unique decoration can be found on the lawn of a home on Hidden Valley Lane. 

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

Long ago, my husband, John and I, started a little holiday tradition all our own. On a night close to Christmas, when no room at the Inn is required, we pour some hot chocolate in a thermos, put holiday tunes on the car radio and drive about the village looking at the holiday lights.

The creative and the traditional scenes depicted on the lawns and storefronts of our neighbors homes and businesses all look magnificent with a light dusting of snow coating the ground; when the nights are longer than the days and your breath lingers heavy in the cold night air.

This year, I took a long my camera to share some of our favorites with the Bayfield Breeze subscribers - our own  holiday postcard, if you will, the 2009 version.

A little church, simply lit, reminds all who pass by this home on Christy Street to remember , "Peace on Earth, Goodwill Toward Men."
A little church, simply lit, reminds all who pass by this home on Christy Street to remember, "Peace on Earth, Goodwill Toward Men."

Traditional holiday trims invite window shoppers to step back in time to an old-fashioned Christmas.
Traditional holiday trims invite window shoppers to step back in time to an old-fashioned Christmas. 

This house on Glass Street suggests an alternative mode of transportation for Santa Claus to use on his yearly trip around the world.
This house on Glass Street suggests an alternative mode of transportation for Santa Claus to use on his yearly trip around the world.

Clan Gregor Square is the heart of the village and at no time of the year is this more apparent than the holiday season.
Clan Gregor Square is the heart of the village and at no time of the year is this more apparent than the holiday season.

 

Want to see what style of Christmas greetings area residents sent to one another over 85 years ago? Then keep scrolling down the page.

SUBMISSIONS 

2009 marked 20 years since I graduated from Sheridan College with a diploma in Print Journalism. I was fortunate to have a job even before the ink on my certificate was dry and I remember sitting at my desk in the newspaper office literally pinching myself to be sure that I wasn’t dreaming. I had wanted to be a journalist since I was nine years-old when I asked for a typewriter for Christmas. My letter to Santa specified, “A real one – not a toy”.

I think I may have inadvertently invented the lap-top all those years ago as my little portable typewriter came with me everywhere I went. I used it sitting up in bed, at a picnic table, under a maple tree or even in the hay mow – wherever inspiration struck my “Remington” was at the ready. And then one fateful day, when heading up the stairs to bed the cover latch released and my beautiful blue typewriter bounced all the way down the steps to the foyer below. I was left standing at the top, holding its protective cover in my hands - brokenhearted.

Today my trusty lap-top is a favored companion. Like my typewriter of old – it has given me new found freedom. Similarly, the “pages” of the Bayfield Breeze have reignited my passion for community news.

We are so fortunate that so many socially conscious and generous people call this village home. People like, Johanna Steegstra and Judith Higgs, who answer the call both here and abroad to provide aid where the need is greatest.

After all, assisting others, especially the tiniest and most helpless of our global citizens, reminds us of the reason behind the season – for it all started with a baby.

From my lap-top to yours, the very merriest of Christmases.

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome. Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m. Please email me at bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443. Hope to see you online soon at www.villageofbayfield.com - Melody

This Christmas greeting from Rose Snowden to John Turner was sent for Christmas 1923. It was shared with the Bayfield Breeze by village resident, Gail King.
This Christmas greeting from Rose Snowden to John Turner was sent for Christmas 1923. It was shared with the Bayfield Breeze by village resident, Gail King.


Bookmark and Share

Click to sign up for weekly email notices.

 
Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder