Bookmark and Share   May 12, 2010    Week 20 Issue 45

MTO LISTENS TO CONCERNS REGARDING FUTURE OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES

These five Osage Orange trees are not rare or endangered but they are a very unusual find in the area being more prevalent in the Central United States. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)
These five Osage Orange trees are not rare or endangered but they are a very unusual find in the area being more prevalent in the Central United States. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)

BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

A red-winged black bird sits perched a top a lofty branch in a cluster of trees at the side of the highway. His call echoes across the nearby pasture but the sound is soon vanquished by the urgent swish of a car as it rushes by. The bird flies away only to return a few minutes later and the scenario is repeated. So it has been for decades at this spot along Hwy. 21.

Five Osage Orange trees have stood stoically watching over motorists as they go about their day-to-day, no one ever really seemed to take notice of these trees, until they were branded with a familiar orange X; the sign of impending progress. It was then that villagers, members of the Bayfield Tree Inventory and Renewal Committee as well as the Bayfield Horticultural Society in particular, took notice. They called the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) to find out what could be done to save these trees from being cut down to make way for the upcoming road improvements scheduled between Bayfield and St. Joseph’s. 

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The cluster of trees fall within a clean zone for the upcoming road project. The orange mark indicated they would be removed but calls of concern by area residents to the MTO have granted them a stay. The mark has been covered over with black and the future of the trees is now under review. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)

And the MTO listened. The trees which fall within the clear zone for the road project have been given a stay; the bright orange Xs have been painted black and their future is now under review. 

To the passerby these five Osage Orange trees may seem of little significance to the overall landscape but they are unique to the area.

According to Michael Mahaffey, who retired to the Bayfield area after working for the Forestry Program with the City of Kitchener, “They are not a rare or endangered tree but they are a very unusual find in this area.”

The trees are native to the Central United States, mostly prevalent in the Red River drainage area of Oklahoma. They were highly prized by early settlers and used as living fences or hedge rows. Their thorny branches served to keep livestock contained. The Osage Nation, from which their name is derived, used their springy wood for making bows.

The Osage Orange was popular with President Franklin D. Roosevelt who used the tree as part of the Great Plains Forest Shelter-belt Project established in the mid-1930s.

“People fussed over them a little because their fruit was so unusual,” said Mahaffey.

The trees will flower in June and once fully established for the season their leaves are long, slender and drooping. A globe like fruit three to five inches in diameter will appear in clusters on the female trees in autumn.

How these five trees took root in the location that they did is anyone’s guess but Mahaffey wonders if it wasn’t due to the efforts of a now extinct creature.

“There was a ground sloth, now extinct, that ate the fruit and may have passed the seeds resulting in the growth of the trees,” he said.

The skin of the fruit gives off a pleasant orange peel smell.

“The fruit contains a chemical compound similar to Deet and research is being done to see if it might work as a bug repellant,” said Mahaffey. “It can also deter spiders, crickets and fleas.” 

Mahaffey would not classify the fruit as edible but squirrels may find it of interest if they can break through the hard outer shell.

He went on to say that the five trees are fairly big considering their variety and the slow growth of hard wood.

“Considering the microclimate and their proximity to road salt applications they have grown to a reasonable size,” he said. “It is not easy for trees to establish along a highway.”


LECTURE TO INFORM ON STATUS OF HURON COUNTY TREES

A local group is standing tall with the trees in the community.

The Bayfield Tree Inventory and Renewal Committee is a group born out of the concern of local residents about the status of trees in the village.

The committee invites all in the community to attend an information meeting on the condition of trees not just in the village but the county as well. Two speakers will be featured at the meeting to be held on May 18 at the Bayfield Town Hall. The presentations will begin at 7 p.m.

“The State of Trees in Huron County” will be the topic of Erica Garfat, conservation officer for Huron County; and “A Vision of What our Treescape Can Become” will be presented by Linda McDougall, landscape planner with the City of London.

For more information please call 519 565-2518.


DOOR PRIZES POPULAR ASPECT OF HOME AND GARDEN SHOW

Marty and Janet Maidment, owners of Bayfield Foodland, presented Theresa Feeney, of Mitchell, and her daughter, Mallory, with a food voucher worth $400 recently. The voucher was donated by the grocery store as a door prize at the Bayfield Lions' Club's Home and Garden Show held in April. Charlie Kalbfliesch (left) represented the Bayfield Lions' Club at the prize presentation. (Submitted Photo)
Marty and Janet Maidment, owners of Bayfield Foodland, presented Theresa Feeney, of Mitchell, and her daughter, Mallory, with a food voucher worth $400 recently. The voucher was donated by the grocery store as a door prize at the Bayfield Lions' Club's Home and Garden Show held in April. Charlie Kalbfliesch (left) represented the Bayfield Lions' Club at the prize presentation. (Submitted Photo)

The 13th annual Bayfield Lions’ Club’s Home and Garden Show was held on Apr. 23-25 at the Bayfield Arena and Community Centre.

Seventy exhibitors, the majority representing Huron County businesses, created beautiful and enticing displays that drew people in to see what services they had to offer.

A popular aspect of the show is the door prizes available to be won by those who attend the show and enter their free admission ticket into the draw.

This year, Theresa Feeney, of Mitchell, won the $400 food voucher donated by Bayfield Foodland. Marg Henderson, of RR2 Zurich, was the lucky winner of the barbecue donated by Bayfield Garage; and Dianne Argyle, of Bayfield, came away with the $25 gift certificate donated by This’ n’ That of Bayfield.
 

ALDEBURCH CONNECTION LINKS VILLAGE WITH WORLD TALENTS

The Bayfield Town Hall will once again be filled with the sound of world renowned musical talents when the fourth annual Bayfield Festival of Song returns to the village for concerts on the first two weekends of June.

The Aldeburgh Connection Artistic Directors Stephen Ralls and Bruce Ubukata are offering up a variety of unique experiences for music lovers.

The festival kicks-off on June 5 with Coffee Concert: SLEEPERS, WAKE! This concert will offer an eclectic mix of Bach to Broadway, featuring piano-duets performed by Ralls and Ubukata and songs by visiting artists.

A Celebrity Recital will be held on the evening of June 5 at 8 p.m. Two dazzling singers, Virginia Hatfield, soprano; and Lauren Segal, mezzo, will perform favorite songs, arias and duets under the accompaniment of Ubukata on piano. These two women are stars with the Canadian Opera Company and have also been busy performing for audiences in Europe and across North America.

On the afternoon of June 6 at 2:30 p.m. a concert to celebrate the arrival of early summer, entitled, “A Harvest of Song” will be held. Four brilliant young singers, Leslie Ann Bradley, soprano; Erica Iris Huang, mezzo; Frank Mutya, tenor; and Vasil Garvanliev, baritone; will share their talents while evoking the splendors of both countryside and gardens. They will be accompanied by Ralls and Ubukata on piano. The concert will be followed by an audience party with the artists.

For the second half of the festival a long weekend is in the offing with a Singers’ Masterclass being held on Thursday, June 10 at 4 p.m. In this new event for the festival, the combined expertise and wisdom of Mary Lou Fallis and Peter Tiefenbach, mixed with a generous measure of humor and sympathy, come into play as they coach young singing students preparing for their careers. Audience goers are invited to join the singers afterwards for a Bistro Night at the Little Inn of Bayfield. Seating for this meal is limited so please contact the inn at 519 565-2611 for reservations and details.

The soprano, Fallis; accompanied by Tiefenbach on piano will return to the hall on June 11 at 8 p.m. for the “Primadonna Sails In!” This evening should prove to be a unique vocal recital - Bayfield will be treated to an affectionate send-up. This is a great opportunity to experience at first hand the personality that has delighted millions on radio, television and around the world!

Another Coffee Concert is scheduled for 11 a.m. on June 12. This time Ralls and Ubukata will perform on piano, “Schumann in the Morning”. Songs from visiting artists will also be on the program. This concert will be a birthday celebration of one of the most romantic of composers. The concert will highlight Schumann’s Spanische Liebeslieder or Spanish Love Songs, for four voices and piano-duet.

Susan Platts, mezzo, will be the featured performer for the Celebrity Recital to be held on June 12 at 8 p.m. She will be accompanied by Ralls on piano. Platts is one of Canada’s most acclaimed singers, with an international reputation. She has been invited to open the Toronto Symphony’s new season. Included in her recital will be a  tribute to composer, Robert Schumann, in honor of the 200th anniversary since his birth (June 8, 1810).

Young artists, Bradley, Huang, Mutya and Garvanliev will be performing, accompanied by Ralls and Ubukata in approximately ten schools in Huron and Perth counties during the week between the scheduled concerts. They will return to the hall on June 13 at 2:30 p.m. for an encore performance of “A Harvest of Song”. Following the concert the artists will join in a party with the audience.

Tickets are available locally by calling Gail Grant at 519 565-2435. They cost $25, Saturday mornings; and $35, Saturday evenings, Friday evenings, Sunday afternoons. The Masterclass on June 10 will cost $15. There is also a subscription price: if buying tickets for more than one concert, please deduct $5 from each ticket.

VILLAGE TO BLOOM IN SHADES OF YELLOW, ORANGE AND BRONZE

Bayfield residents have always shown a strong sense of pride in their horticultural efforts but this year they may be recognized for it.

The Municipality of Bluewater has entered the provincial competition in the 2010 Communities in Bloom (CIB) program. The committee is referred to as the Bluewater Blooms Committee.

The “kick-off” for the Bluewater Blooms initiative will be held on June 19 on Main Street in front of the library at 11 a.m. All interested groups and individuals are welcome to attend and sunflower seeds will be available.

To learn more about Bluewater Blooms plan to attend the May 17th meeting of the Bayfield Horticultural Society. Jim Fergusson will be speaking on the project. As an added bonus a planter demonstration will also be given at this meeting. The horticultural society will meet at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building starting at 7:30 p.m. All are welcome.

The Bluewater Blooms Committee would like to make everyone aware that the flower colors chosen for the project are white, yellow, orange and bronze. Residents and businesses might take these colors into consideration when organizing their spring plantings.

CIB is a Canadian non-profit organization committed to fostering civic pride, environmental responsibility and beautification through community involvement and the challenge of a national program, with focus on the promotion and value of green spaces in urban settings. The program consists of communities receiving information and being evaluated either provincially or nationally by a volunteer jury of trained professionals on the accomplishments of their entire community (municipal, private, corporate and institutional sectors, citizens) on eight key criteria.

Bluewater will participate with other communities in its population category, and be evaluated by CIB judges on the eight program criteria. Bloom ratings from one to five blooms (five being the highest ranking) are awarded to participating communities at a provincial awards ceremony annually in the fall. The program provides for two communities in each province to participate in the following year’s national edition.

 MEDWAY HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR TO PERFORM THIS WEEKEND

The golden voices of The Medway High School Senior Choir will echo through the Bayfield Town Hall on the evening of May 16.

The choir, which hails from the school in Arva, ON, is considered the best in Southwestern Ontario. In 2009, and again this year, they were the proud recipients of several gold medals at the Kiwanis Music Festival.  They were also presented with gold medals at the 2009 Ontario Music Festival.

The Medway High School Senior Choir has 30 to 35 members. Under the able leadership of Mrs. McNaughton and Mr. Bynum, the choir presents a varied program from classics to modern.

“The choir has come to the hall on previous occasions and we in Bayfield who have enjoyed their performances can attest to the wonderful musical experience they provide. The perfect acoustics of the hall make the experience all the more enjoyable,” said Pat Langley, of the Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society (BTHHS) in a recent press release.

The concert will begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 each and are available by calling Langley at 519 565-2894; or Charlie Kalbfleisch at 519 565-2244. They are also available at Ernie King Music in Goderich. 

All proceed from this event will go to the BTHHS.


 LIONS FOR LIFE
LIONS FOR LIFE
Two long time members of the Bayfield Lions' Club were honored with Life Memberships from Lions' Clubs International at a dinner meeting held Apr. 27. Making the presentation to Lion Charlie Kalbfleish and Lion Herb Beatty were Bayfield Club President, Dave Overboe (right) and District A15 Governor Karen McNeight (left). (Submitted Photo)

 

optimist club

“Rubber Duckie, you're so fine
And I'm lucky that you're mine
Rubber Duckie, I'm awfully fond of you.”

Three lucky people will be singing this old Sesame Street classic on May 23 when their rubber ducks are the first to cross the finish line in the Bayfield Optimist Club’s Rubber Duck Race.

This race is a first for the village and will be held between the piers at the harbor’s mouth at 11 a.m. on the Sunday of the Victoria Day weekend.

Only 500 ducks are available and tickets are on sale now for $5 each at Brandon’s Hardware, local restaurants and club members.

Three prizes will be awarded to the fastest ducks: 1st place, a barbecue valued at $500, donated by Bayfield Garage-Auto Pro; 2nd place, $200 gift certificate to Bayfield Foodland, donated by Janet and Marty Maidment; 3rd place, a $200 gift certificate to Walmart, donated by Brian Coombs-Remax.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Marg Garbarino and Charlie Kalbfleisch will be the featured lecturers in the next installment of the Bayfield Historical Society’s Speaker Series on May 24.

They will describe what Bayfield was like the decade after World War II and talk about the fire at the Ritz Hotel on Labour Day weekend 1947 which almost destroyed the whole village. This was one of the most significant events in Bayfield's history and it changed the village for ever. And they were there!

The evening will be held on May 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building.

  CHURCH YARD SALES

Two of the village’s churches will be hosting upcoming yard sales and would encourage all in the community to keep them in mind for donating the contents of cupboards and closets from spring cleaning.

Trinity Anglican Church will be holding their yard sale, combined with a plant sale, on May 21-22. If anyone has toured the church’s lovely gardens they should be thoroughly excited about the plant portion of the sale as the more “green thumbed” in the congregation will be sharing their plantings.
The sale will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days.

Then on June 19, St. Andrew’s United Church will hold their yard sale and bake sale. Antiques and treasures will be featured in the sale and those who work up an appetite while shopping will not be disappointed.  An Egg ‘N Bagel Breakfast will be offered as well as hot dogs and coffee.

St. Andrew’s sale will run from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. For information regarding the event call Joan at 519 565-2730.

TOWN HALL MEETING

The Historic Bayfield Town Hall, built in 1882, has graced the edge of Clan Gregor Square since it was moved to that location in 1920.

It is now time for the annual meeting for the Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society, the committee that ensures the building’s ongoing care. The meeting will be held on May 31 at 4:30 p.m. in the basement of the town hall.

For more information please contact Margo Robeson at 519 565-2827.
 

DINERS' CLUB

The Bayfield Diners’ Club was recently featured in the Bayfield Breeze demonstrating just how much they appreciate their volunteers, well now they are in search of some new helpers.

The meals are served at noon on Thursdays at the Bayfield Community Centre. There are two shifts of volunteers that work to ensure the meal is produced each week. The first shift runs from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. while the second goes from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. It is the second shift that could use additional hands.

If you could help in this time slot or would like some more information please contact Pearl Hartman at 519 482-5283.

BOOKS AND BRUNCH

Drew Hayden Taylor will be the guest author at the next Books and Brunch event, sponsored by The Village Bookshop, to be held at the Little Inn on May 30. 

Originally from the Curve Lake First Nations, in Central Ontario, he has spent the last two decades traveling the world and writing about it from the Aboriginal perspective. An award-winning playwright, author, columnist, film maker and lecturer, he has managed to bridge the gap between cultures by tickling the funny bone.  He has recently published his first adult novel, Motorcycles and Sweetgrass.
 
Tickets are $30 and are available now at The Village Bookshop. 

UNITED CHURCH

Along with spring flowers, the fifth month of the year also brings the annual May Pole Luncheon hosted by St. Andrew’s United Church UCW.

The luncheon will be held on May 19 at the church starting at 11:30 a.m. Tickets cost $10 and are available by calling 519 565-2479.

Proceeds from the meal will go to the Weekend to End Breast Cancer Walk-a-thon and a purchase from the United Church Hope Book.

LEARNING CENTRE

Village of Bayfield Archivist Ralph Laviolette will facilitate one of the topics on the schedule for Enhanced Aging Series sponsored by the Lake Huron Learning Collaborative Centre, May 13.

Laviolette’s talk on The History of Furniture Making in Huron County will be held at the Huron County Museum in Goderich from 2-4 p.m. The lecture will be followed by a guided tour of Made in Bayfield - The Work of Johann Gemeinhardt on exhibit at the museum from now to Dec. 5.

Gemeinhardt (1826-1912), was born in the Bavarian area of Germany and settled in Bayfield around 1850. He had completed his cabinet making apprenticeship before leaving Germany. The display includes, various tools, drawings and furniture pieces, both large and small, which show the intricacies of his life's work.

To attend the lecture the cost is $15. To register call Anna Dalton-Needles at the LHLCC, 519 524-4154 or email info@lakehuronlearning.ca.

BACC NEWS

On May 21, the directors of the Bayfield Area Chamber of Commerce (BACC) would like to invite their membership to enjoy a cup of coffee and some breakfast with the mayor and others.

Mayor of Bluewater, Bill Dowson, and Bluewater council members are scheduled to attend the breakfast as is MP Ben Lobb. It is hoped that MPP Carol Mitchell will also take part.

Interested BACC members may have two tickets to the breakfast; these are available at no charge on a first requested, first given basis. 

The event will be held at the Bayfield Town Hall with coffee being served at 7:30 a.m. followed by breakfast at 8 a.m.

The guest speaker will be Mike Pullen, senior economic development officer for Huron County. His topic is entitled, “Creative Potential: Bluewater and the Economy”.  

To reserve tickets please email Roger Lewington at rlewington@tcc.on.ca or info@villageofbayfield.com The event is sponsored by OLG. 

BRVTA

Wild Turkeys and hikers beware it’s hunting season again.

The Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) would like to let the community know that the Woodland Trail will be closed from now until June 1 for the Wild Turkey Hunt.

The other two BRVTA trails remain open, the Heritage Trail, through the village, as well as the Sawmill Trail, on the north side of the Bayfield River. Other local trails, such as, Bannockburn and Naftel’s Creek do not permit hunting and are available to walkers throughout the year. 

BAYFIELD CONCERT SERIES

The Bayfield Concert Series designed to provide springtime entertainment is now segueing right into summer.

On June 3, Basia Bulat, along with Fourth Avenue, will perform at the Bayfield Town Hall. Then on July 22, Six Shooter recording artist, Justin Rutledge, will take to the town hall stage, along with Andy McGuire.

For both concerts the doors open at 8p.m. with the concert to follow at 8:30 p.m.
 
Tickets are available for $25 per person per show at the Black Dog Pub, Ernie King (Goderich) and at www.ticketscene.ca
 
The Bayfield Concert Series is please to support Childhood Cancer Awareness.  "Cure Childhood Cancer" silicone bracelets will be available for purchase at all of the concerts.  Donations are greatly appreciated.

The concerts are being presented by Meades Bros. Productions and The Little Inn of Bayfield. Overnight packages are now available at The Little Inn; to learn more please call 1-800-565-1832.

FITNESS FUN

There are plenty of ways to get in shape for summer in Bayfield.

Pole walkers meet Tuesday mornings at 9 a.m. at 6 Main Street. The session incorporates an hour of walking with an ending cool down stretch.   
 
Exercise classes will continue through the summer months.

Dancefit and Toning classes are held Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m. The Sit and Get Fit Classes take place on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:15 a.m. Both classes are held in the Bayfield Community Centre. 

BRIDGE CLUB

The Wednesday Evening Bridge Club welcomes all enthusiastic card players to attend their next meeting on May 12 at the Bayfield Lions’ Community Building. The decks will be shuffled starting at 7 p.m.

FILM SOCIETY

Cairo Time is the title of the final film in the spring series of movies being offered by the Bayfield Film Society. The curtain will go up on this film on May 13.

A later start time is being tried for this season and the films will commence at 7:30 p.m. in the Bayfield Town Hall.

Tickets cost $10 per person at the door the night of the film.  

For more information please contact Lynne Gillians at 519 565-5884 or by email at lynnegillians@hotmail.com 
 

Did you know that some of these advertisements are actual links to the business’ website? We encourage you to click on the advertisements and see what these entrepreneurs have to offer

 

 

REMEMBER ME?

There are countless photographs of people in the Bayfield Historical Society’s Archives collection, but sadly their names were never recorded. In this section we will showcase an image with the hopes that one of our subscribers might be able to identify the individual(s) in the photo. Please email your information to the Editor’s attention at the address listed near the bottom of the page in “Submissions”.

This week, a pastoral photo dating from the 1920s is featured of two men, a little girl and a horse. Anyone remember them?
 

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Make your comments, view a larger version...click on any image and it will take you to Flickr.

 

ISSUE 43

BB30

In Issue 43, a very old photo was shown. Records show her last name to be Beecham. Anyone know who she is or her connection to an early Bayfield family?

ISSUE 44

BB31

In Issue 44, Joan Cluff recognized the lady in the photo to be Gertrude Gaylord Gairdner. We are still searching for the identity of her companion in the photo.

Bookmark and Share  PHOTO STORY

Bayfield and area chamber of commerce

fashion served as garnish at fundraiser for breast cancer research
 

The Bayfield Town Hall was the place to be on the afternoon of May 9 if you had an interest in the latest fashions being offered on Main Street this year.
The Bayfield Town Hall was the place to be on the afternoon of May 9 if you had an interest in the latest fashions being offered on Main Street this year.

Body Garnish - the figure as this year's canvas was the theme of the fashion show. Fashion and art were combined as models from Kryart Studio underwent a transformation.
Body Garnish - the figure as this year's canvas was the theme of the fashion show. Fashion and art were combined as models from Kryart Studio underwent a transformation.

 

Karen Andrews from Inspirations modelled some truly inspiring looks for Spring. Karen Andrews from Inspirations modelled some truly inspiring looks for Spring.

Several very polished looks were shown as part of the BACC Luncheon and Fashion Show held on May 9 at the Bayfield Town Hall. Here, Rebecca Rowat models some items available at The Emporium.
Several very polished looks were shown as part of the BACC Luncheon and Fashion Show held on May 9 at the Bayfield Town Hall. This woman models some items available at The Emporium.

 

 

Pattty Burger, with Inspirations, shows the latest in hats, shoes, jackets and handbags.
Pattty Burger, with Inspirations, shows the latest in hats, shoes, jackets and handbags.
Kelly Dearlove, of Varna, models an outfit from The Wardrobe Bizaar while her companion,  Cannelle,  a bilingual Golden Retriever proudly displays Woof N' Stuff gear.
Kelly Dearlove, of Varna, models an outfit from The Wardrobe Bizaar while her companion, Cannelle, a bilingual Golden Retriever proudly displays Woof N' Stuff gear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About sixty people attended the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce's Luncheon and Fashion Show held at the Bayfield Town Hll on Mother's Day afternoon.
About sixty people attended the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce's Luncheon and Fashion Show held at the Bayfield Town Hll on Mother's Day afternoon.

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MELODY FALCONER-POUNDER

“Body Garnish – the Figure as this Year’s Canvas” was the title of the Luncheon and Fashion Show held on May 9 at the Bayfield Town Hall.

Kryart Studio really took the theme to heart having area artists transform the skin of models into a canvas of color. A gasp of delight rose from the 60 strong crowd when the first painted model took to the stage.

Several local businesses showed off their spring and summer fashion collections; something to suit everyone's taste was on display. There were even fashions for four legged companions as Woof N' Stuff, a store new to Main Street, brought canine models to show off their inventory. 

The lunch was provided by the Bayfield Berry Farm and the coffee was supplied by This N' That. The 1st Bayfield Pathfinders served the lunch.
 
The Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce sponsored the show with profits going to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

Odin and Hayden Hessel are ready for some fun with gear and clothing available from their parents' store Outside Projects.
Odin and Hayden Hessel are ready for some fun with gear and clothing available from their parents' store Outside Projects.
 

Sid Reaburn, of Hensall, keeps the treats coming for the canine models at the fashion show. Niki (left) and Noelle (right) were very stylish in their clothing available at Woof N' Stuff, a store new to Main Street this seaon. Reaburn is modelling clothing from The Wardrobe Bizaar. Sid Reaburn, of Hensall, keeps the treats coming for the canine models at the fashion show. Niki (left) and Noelle (right) were very stylish in their clothing available at Woof N' Stuff, a store new to Main Street this seaon. Reaburn is modelling clothing from The Wardrobe Bizaar.

 

Members of the 1st Bayfield Pathfinders, including Brayden Knox, were called upon  by the chamber to serve the lunch which featured sandwiches and squares from the Bayfield Berry Farm. Members of the 1st Bayfield Pathfinders, including Brayden Knox, were called upon by the chamber to serve the lunch which featured sandwiches and squares from the Bayfield Berry Farm.

 

Members of the audience were treated to a very special door prize throughout the fashion show: five minute neck and shoulder massages were given courtesy of Kelly Elson from The Spa in Bayfield.
Members of the audience were treated to a very special door prize throughout the fashion show: five minute neck and shoulder massages were given courtesy of Kelly Elson from The Spa in Bayfield.

 

 

 


Melody Falconer-Pounder

SUBMISSIONS

Why is it modern comforts like to seek revenge in packs? That is what happened at our house on Monday, the spinner on the washing machine decided to take a vacation, the phone line went dead for a while, we lost the use of our portable phone and the lawn mower developed a stubborn streak.

My solution was to get a pedicure and leave the repairs to the experts. Well, I jest…although I did get a pedicure but its scheduling was purely coincidental.

These inconveniences happen and while they are stressful it is necessary to remind yourself that there is always someone in a worse situation than you. I think I learned this sense of adaptability watching my Dad on the farm…every day his chosen lifestyle brought with it challenges and adversity.

Take these scenarios for instance:
• your cow breaks out of the orchard and heads straight for the neighbor's bull,
• the front wheel of your tractor gets stuck in a ground hog hole upsetting a load of freshly baled hay;
• the other tractor you use to rescue the first one with becomes hopelessly stuck
• and the big doors on the back of the barn literally blow off in a storm and land a crumpled pile of wood in the nearby pasture
And my Dad, whose temper did flare on occasion, for the most part took it in stride, knuckled down and got the job done. He’d even laugh about it once in a while.

Puts the whole lawn mower issue into perspective doesn’t it? - Melody
 

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome.
Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m.

Please email me at
bayfield.breeze@villageofbayfield.com or call 519-565-2443.
Hope to see you online soon at
www.villageofbayfield.com 



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Credits:

Writer, editor, photographer: Melody Falconer-Pounder

Web publisher/Graphic Designer: Dennis Pal

Advertising Sales: Mike Dixon

Logo Design: Kyle Vanderburgh, Goderich Print Shop

Special thanks to the Bayfield and Area Chamber of Commerce

Breeze Committee: Ian Matthew, Roger Lewington, Mike Dixon, John Pounder, Dennis Pal, Melody Falconer-Pounder